More Growers Going Soybean After Soybean in 2017

Feb 24, 2017 1
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More Growers Going Soybean After Soybean in 2017

The USDA presented its first guess on planted acreage for 2017; and, as expected, corn acres are forecast to be down and soybean acres up. On Thursday, USDA pegged corn acreage at 90 million acres, down from the 94 million acres planted last year. The USDA pegged soybean acreage this season at 88 million acres, which would be 4 million acres more than last year.  The average corn price per bushel is estimated to be $3.50 for 2017, while the Soybean average price was penciled in at $9.60 per bushel. This means there are going to be a lot of soybean after soybean fields planted this year.

Trevor Perkins,

Trevor Perkins, agronomist with Stewart Seeds, says going continuous soybeans can pose some challenges, “While this can certainly provide some economic benefit, there are some diseases you will have to manage. When selecting a seed variety, tolerance for SDS and Phytophthora will be very important.”  He added that scouting for frog eye leaf spot will also be a consideration.

Seed companies have been reporting all winter that soybean seed orders have been up. Perkins says Stewart has a good soybean variety lineup for 2017, “We have some very strong Roundup Xtend that have good yields as well as a good agronomic package.”  During a grower meeting in Shelby County on Thursday, Perkins presented an update on the Roundup Ready to Xtend system and the weed control benefits it provides, especially on hard to control weeds. According to Perkins, the Roundup Ready to Xtend system provides a 5.4 bu per acre average advantage vs. Liberty Link in Herbicide System Trials.

Monsanto Stressing Stewardship with New Dicamba Herbicide

Feb 24, 2017 2

A new tool to control glyphosate, ALS, and PPO resistant broadleaf weeds in soybeans hits the fields this year and the Office of Indiana State Chemist (OISC) has published a set of guidelines for those farmers considering newly approved dicamba-based herbicide products. One of those is Monsanto’s XtendiMax™ herbicide with VaporGrip™ Technology, approved by the EPA for in-crop use.

Glen Murphy, a southern Indiana technical agronomist for Monsanto is one of those educating farmers and applicators about the critical need for accurate application.

“It’s been an awkward launch,” he explained. “Through most of my career as a commercial agronomist we talk about all the features and benefits, and it puts a lot of excitement in the air. But it is important with this technology, while it provides very effective and uniquely effective weed control options and flexibility for soybean growers, we need to be very careful with the stewardship. We know in the state of Indiana there are some very high dollar crops when you think of tomatoes and melons, and potentially a little tobacco as you come south, but these are crops that are going to be very sensitive to the XtendiMax herbicide or any form of dicamba.”

Using a dicamba-based herbicide requires extreme caution because of how active it is even at very low levels. Dicamba formulations for corn are not new, but dicamba tolerant soybeans are.

“So we have been really emphasizing and encouraging not only our applicators but our farmers, everyone who will be interested in the system, come out and participate in the XtendiMax application training.”

And he told HAT a large adoption of the system is expected this year, with a potential for 15 million acres.

Murphy was part of 2-hour training sessions last week at the National Farm Machinery Show. The Roundup Ready® Xtend Crop System is the largest launch in Monsanto’s history, and because of the delays in getting approval Murphy says growers benefit from the availability of 2nd and 3rd generation high yielding genetics right away.

Listen for more from Murphy including the approval process update:Glen Murphy Xtend update

Ag Groups Ask for Infrastructure Help

Feb 24, 2017 1
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Over 200 groups with a stake in agriculture and rural areas sent a letter to President Donald Trump asking for rural needs to be part of any plan to improve the nation’s infrastructure. A few of the groups that signed the letter included Farm Credit Council, American Farm Bureau Federation, and the American Soybean Association, among many others. The letter stated: “Past infrastructure initiatives often focused on urban and suburban infrastructure while not adequately addressing the unique needs of rural communities.” The groups added that American agriculture truly feeds the world and creates jobs. To ensure that America remains a leader in world agricultural production, they said infrastructure needs have to be addressed, noting that the nation’s deteriorating infrastructure threatens that leadership role in feeding the world. The groups cautioned that the federal government cannot do it alone, saying it should partner with local governments and find private funding sources, a move supported by Trump advisers.

Alabama Republican Robert Aderholt is Chair of the House Appropriations Committee. Investing in rural infrastructure has been promised to be a high priority in fiscal 2018 allocations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Source: NAFB News Service

Largest Ag Producers Changing Crop Protection Plans

Feb 24, 2017 1
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A new study from Millenium Research shows that the nation’s largest farmers are still uncommitted or making changes to their crop protection plans. The “Farmer Speaks” study shows producers being more aggressive in cutting costs after a tough year in 2016. Growers who farm 1,000 or more acres are planning on making the highest percentage of cost-cutting at ten percent. Crop protection products and seed traits are the two areas where farmers look to make the biggest cost cuts. Twenty-five percent of the respondents say they are using a different weed control system in their corn and soybean fields this year. Corn farmers say they are looking at a fifty percent change in their crop protection products.

Several of the nation’s largest producers say they have not made decisions yet regarding crop protection products on at least 1,000 acres. Growers are showing an increasing interest in soybean traits this year. Forty-four percent of soybean growers making changes this year will use a different product versus 2016. One-third of growers say insecticides and fungicides for soybeans and corn are their most undecided products heading into the planting season.
Source: NAFB News Service

Ex-NFL-player-turned-prep-school-coach reportedly fired over 3-year-old picture with alcohol bottle

Feb 24, 2017 1

A three-year-old photo of a former-NFL-player-turned-prep-school-coach posing with a bottle of alcohol may have cost him his coaching job at a Georgia Christian prep schol.

Fernando Bryant told 11 Alive on Thursday that the school, Strong Rock Christian School, in Locust Grove, Ga., asked him to resign from his position on Feb. 19 after parents complained about what he was sharing on social media.

When Bryant refused to resign, he was fired. The station reported that the school did not identify which online post caused the complaints.

“This letter will confirm that Strong Rock Christian School has made a decision not to move forward with your employment in the position of head coach of the football team and physical education teacher,” a letter of terminiation read, according to 11 Alive.

Bryant, a former Detroit Lions defensive back, said he was led to believe it was one of his wife’s postings on social media that led to his firing. His wife, Amber Bryant, appeared on the now-defunct Bravo series “Mother Funders,” and the picture–on Amber’s private socail media account– showed the couple with a bottle of alcohol.

Bryant said he was disappointed about the school’s decision. He said he turned down two other coaching jobs to take the one with Strong Rock Christian. Bryant said the school did not make any mention of a no-drinking policy nor did it have any social media guidelines that he knew about.

“It is a little disheartening. I went through a long process,” Bryant said. “I don’t understand it from the standpoint of the day they hired me to the day they said they couldn’t have me as their head coach. Nothing had changed. Nothing changed from the standpoint of anything they knew about me.”

Bryant said he might explore legal action against the school.

Click for more from 11 Alive.

2 DC officers wounded in shooting, suspect dead

Feb 24, 2017 2

Two police officer in Washington, D.C., were wounded Thursday night in a shooting that resulted in a suspect’s death.

Few details about the shooting were immediately known. The incident occured at around 10:40 p.m. Sources told Fox 5 DC that the officers appeared to be making an arrest prior to the shooting. 

In a seperate shooting, four were wounded in the southeastern part of the city. No arrests were made in that incident.

Click for more from Fox 5 DC.

CPAC: Pence says 'America's ObamaCare nightmare is about to end'

Feb 23, 2017 11

Vice President Mike Pence sought to rally conservatives for the fight to repeal and replace ObamaCare Wednesday, telling a fired-up audience at CPAC Thursday that the health care law “has failed” and “must go.”

Pence’s speech capped the first day of the annual conference, during which President Donald Trump’s top aide warned activists not to “squander” GOP control of the White House and both Houses of Congress.

“Our fight didn’t end on [Election Day],” Pence said. “We won the day, but make no mistake about it. The harder work, the most important work, now lies ahead.”

This is a developing story and will be updated.

CPAC: Pence says 'America's ObamaCare nightmare is about to end'

Feb 23, 2017 11

Vice President Mike Pence sought to rally conservatives for the fight to repeal and replace ObamaCare Wednesday, telling a fired-up audience at CPAC Thursday that the health care law “has failed” and “must go.”

Pence’s speech capped the first day of the annual conference, during which President Donald Trump’s top aide warned activists not to “squander” GOP control of the White House and both Houses of Congress.

“Our fight didn’t end on [Election Day],” Pence said. “We won the day, but make no mistake about it. The harder work, the most important work, now lies ahead.”

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Montana bill effectively bans all abortions after 24 weeks

Feb 23, 2017 13

Montana lawmakers pushed forward with a measure Thursday that would effectively ban all abortions after 24 weeks of pregnancy, regardless of medical risks to a woman.

Critics of the bill said it could be among the most extreme anti-abortion laws in the nation, even as other states consider their own proposals that would reduce the window for legal abortions.

Montana already outlaws late-term abortions, unless the life of the woman is at risk. The legislation would require physicians to deliver a fetus at six months or later by inducing a woman into labor or performing a cesarean section.

Once the fetus is removed, doctors would be required to attempt to use whatever means to resuscitate the baby. Doctors who violate the law could be charged with a felony.

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“They either have to be a miracle worker or a felon,” said Sen. Diane Sands, a Democrat from Missoula who opposed the bill. She added, “It’s by far the most extreme measure I’ve seen ever proposed in Montana.”

The measure won preliminary passage in the state Senate 32-18, mostly along partisan lines.

The bill’s main proponent, Republican Sen. Albert Olszewski, said scientific and technological advances have increased the viability of fetuses.

“Now we have an issue of improved viability,” said Olszewski, who is also an orthopedic surgeon.

“This bill was inspired by a real situation, a situation where a late-term pregnancy put a woman in a life-threatening condition and had to deal with this horrible decision of being told she had to terminate this pregnancy,” he said.

Both sides acknowledged that the proposal could be a first of its kind. Opponents expressed concern that the law would take away medical decisions from a woman and her doctor.

The early victory by supporters will likely be short-lived. Even if the bill gets final approval in the Senate and wins support from the House — both controlled by Republicans — it would almost certainly be vetoed by Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock, who supports abortion rights.

Should it become law, the measure would be challenged by abortion-rights groups, said Martha Stahl, CEO of Planned Parenthood Montana.

“It is quite extreme, and we believe this bill is unconstitutional under Roe v. Wade,” Stahl said, referring to the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion.

She said the legislation “requires women to undergo invasive medical procedures that might not be the best medical options for a woman.”

Some witnesses say Kansas bar shooting was racially motivated

Feb 23, 2017 15

Prosecutors on Thursday charged a 51-year-old man with murder and attempted murder after he allegedly started shooting in a crowded suburban Kansas City bar, killing one man and injuring two others, in an attack that some witnesses said was racially motivated.

Authorities repeatedly declined at a news conference to say whether the shooting was a hate crime although local police said they were working with the FBI to investigate the case.

A bartender at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, said that Adam Purinton used “racial slurs” before he started shooting on Wednesday night as patrons were watching the University of Kansas-TCU basketball game on television.

Srinivas Kuchibhotla, 32, died at an area hospital, police said. Alok Madasani, 32, and Ian Grillot, 24, were hospitalized and are in stable condition, they said. Witnesses said Grillot had stepped in and tried to stop the shooter. The Linked-in accounts for Kuchibhotla and Madasani say that they were engineers working at GPS-maker Garmin and had studied in India.

Local, county, state and federal law enforcement authorities attended the news conference where the murder charges were announced.

Asked if the presence of federal authorities indicated the shooting could be considered a hate crime, FBI special agent Eric Jackson said it was too early to determine.

“This was a violent crime and we want the best prosecution that relates to this because there are victims of this crime and we want the community to know that … we’re looking to make sure that the individual involved in this is held accountable for his actions.”

Bartender Garret Bohnen told the Kansas City Star that Kuchibhotla and Madasani stopped at Austins for a drink once or twice a week.

“From what I understand when he was throwing racial slurs at the two gentlemen (Kuchibhotla and Madasani), Ian (Grillot) stood up for them,” Bohnen said. “We’re all proud of him.”

Witnesses also told the Star that Purinton yelled “get out of my country” before he opened fire.

GoFundMe pages were started to help pay expenses for all three of the victims.

Grillot’s sister, Maggie Grillot, said on his GoFundMe page that “Ian stood up for two people being mistreated by a man who was in the wrong … This resulted in Ian being shot.”

Purinton was taken into custody just after midnight on Thursday morning at an Applebee’s about 70 miles to the southeast of Olathe in Clinton, Missouri, authorities said.

Assistant Clinton Police Chief Sonny Lynch said an Applebee’s bartender summoned police to the bar where the man was drinking because he said he’d been involved in a shooting. The unarmed Purinton was taken into custody and interviewed by detectives from Olathe.

“He mentioned he had been involved in a shooting and we went out there and picked him up,” Lynch said.

The bar where the shooting took place was closed Thursday, with a sign in the door that said it would remain closed indefinitely.