Biden says he could have won the presidency if he ran

Mar 26, 2017 20

Former Vice President Joe Biden said on Friday that if he had run for president in 2016 he could have won.

Biden told students at Colgate University in New York that the Democratic primary would have been “very difficult.”

Biden said his son Beau’s battle with brain cancer kept him out of the race.

Biden said anyone who runs for president should be able to “look the public in the eye and promise you they can give you 100 percent,” the Observer-Dispatch of Utica reported.  

More on this…

The former vice president says that he doesn’t regret not running, but added, “Do I regret not being president? Yes.”

Biden also added that he hopes President Donald Trump “grows into the job a little bit.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Utah's governor signs abortion-halting legislation

Mar 25, 2017 22

Utah’s governor signed legislation on Saturday that would require doctors to inform women that medication-induced abortions can be halted after taking just one of two pills, despite doctors’ groups saying there is little evidence to back up that idea.

Proponents of the idea said doctors can give a woman the hormone progesterone to stop an abortion after she has taken the first of two medications needed to complete the abortion.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has said that there is no medically accepted evidence that a drug-induced abortion can be interrupted.

Since 2015, Arkansas and South Dakota have enacted laws requiring doctors to tell women about stopping an abortion.

Bills are under consideration in Indiana and North Carolina. Colorado also considered a similar proposal this year, but it was killed in a committee in the Democratic-led House earlier this month.

GORSUCH TO FEINSTEIN: ABORTION RULING IS ‘PRECEDENT’

Arizona passed a similar law in 2015. But it was repealed after Planned Parenthood took the issue to court, arguing that the new law violates abortion providers’ First Amendment rights by forcing them to repeat a state-mandated message against their medical judgment.

Planned Parenthood did not return requests for comment on Utah’s bill. It is unclear whether the organization has plans to take the issue in Utah to court.

Republican Rep. Keven Stratton of Orem, who sponsored Utah’s measure, said that the plan would give women more information about their options.

The law has been scheduled to go into effect in May.

FLORIDA SUPREME COURT OVERTURNS ABORTION BAN AT CLINIC

About a third of women who seek abortions in early pregnancy choose medical abortions because they want a less invasive procedure than a surgical abortion.

The procedure requires taking two pills. The first is mifepristone, which blocks progesterone and breaks down the lining of the uterus. The second pill is misoprostol, which causes the body to undergo changes similar to a miscarriage.

Another Utah abortion law passed last year requires doctors to somehow administer anesthesia or painkillers to a fetus before an abortion, based on the disputed premise that a fetus can feel pain at that stage. Doctors said they didn’t know how to comply with the law because it wasn’t based on science.

Divided GOP makes dismantling ObamaCare little more than campaign promise

Mar 25, 2017 24

There was supposed to be a death panel when it came to ObamaCare: Congressional Republicans.

Starting in 2009, Republicans in Congress promised to euthanize the then-bill, later law. They’d kill it. “Repeal and replace” was the GOP mantra as the party stormed the House in the 2010 midterm elections.

Republicans echoed the incantation in 2012 and 2014. The “repeal and replace” declaration even helped Republicans capture the Senate in 2014. The House and Senate voted on a bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare in 2015-16. But President Obama vetoed it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., argued that’s why it was essential that voters reward the party with “unified government.”

“I’m tired of divided government,” Ryan said. “It doesn’t work very well.”

The speaker never thought President Trump would make it to the White House. He feared Trump’s lewd, “Access Hollywood” tape wound sandbag GOP House and Senate candidates across the country. Trump was the GOP presidential nominee and slated to speak at a political rally in the battleground state of Wisconsin the day after the tape materialized.

Ryan fretted about what Trump’s appearance on the stage would mean for himself and Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., locked in a competitive re-election campaign, as control of the Senate swung in the balance.

The speaker disinvited candidate Trump.

But Ryan is a pragmatist. When Trump captured the White House, the GOP maintained control of the Senate and Democrats barely dented the Republican majority in the House.

Ryan’s vision of unified government became a reality. With unified government, Republicans could repeal and replace ObamaCare, undo dozens of Obama-era policies and finally retrench the tax code.

It was easy to vote dozens of times to repeal ObamaCare when Republicans used dummy ammunition on a target practice range that doubles as the House floor. But as soon as the ordnance went live, it blew up in their faces.

Republicans have never held a roll call vote in the House to replace the 2010 health care law known since the party took control in 2011. The Senate never held a roll call vote on an ObamaCare replacement plan since taking the majority in that chamber in 2015.

That streak remains intact today. Republicans have never agreed on any health care replacement plan that would pass the House and Senate.

It’s not hard to decipher the code around Capitol Hill if you know what to look for.

The House Rules Committee — the gateway for legislation to the House floor — met for nearly 13 hours Wednesday without setting the groundwork for the chamber to consider the GOP health care bill for debate Thursday.

“The deal hasn’t been cut yet,” bemoaned committee Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, just before midnight Wednesday.

Ryan and the rest of his leadership team conducted a lengthy conclave in his office Wednesday night with members of the “Tuesday Group,” an amalgam of 54 moderate Republicans led by Pennsylvania Rep. Charlie Dent.

Most everyone then escaped out a back exit to elude a throng of press waiting in the hallway. Dent’s office quickly published a statement declaring his opposition to the health care package. The usually-genial Rep. Bruce Poliquin, R-Maine, speed-walked out the front, ignoring reporters’ questions and not even making eye contact.

But the reticence spoke volumes. Many moderates were disgusted.

“It’s a terrible deal. Leadership is asking the Tuesday Group to vote for it so leadership doesn’t look bad for pulling the bill,” lamented one member who requested anonymity. “Members are asked to walk the plank.”

Moderate Republicans faced the most exposure on this bill and could pay with their seats if they voted yea.

Meantime, negotiations continued with the conservative House Freedom Caucus. White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, top adviser Steve Bannon and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney (who co-founded the caucus when he served in Congress) descended on Capitol Hill for a short meeting Thursday night with all House Republicans.

Their message?

“Let’s vote,” Bannon said.

“It’s up to those guys in there,” said Mulvaney, jerking his head over his right shoulder toward Republicans huddled in a conference room in the basement of the Capitol.

“You heard a lot of members tonight express their passion about getting this done,” said House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., afterwards. When asked if he was still whipping the vote, Scalise replied, “We will have more conversations tonight.”

Several senior House GOP sources made clear that the administration was responsible for converting nays to yeas. Some House Republican leadership figures and White House sources openly lit into the Freedom Caucus, saying there was an effort to “isolate” those members for never budging.

“Nothing’s changed,” sighed exhausted caucus leader Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., after the meeting. “I’m not confident in anything right now. All I’m confident in is I’m going home to go to bed.”

People weren’t home in bed very long. Updated bill text arrived just before midnight Thursday, courting the likes of some moderates.

GOP Reps. Tom MacArthur, N.J.; Martha McSally, Ariz.; Elise Stefanik, N.Y.; and Tim Murphy, Pennsylvania, all applauded the changes. The Rules Committee scheduled a 7 a.m. meeting to prepare the updated bill for the floor Friday.

“The directive to us last night was to put our pencils down and turn our papers in,” said Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, as the House GOP prepared the health care bill for debate.

But something was amiss.

Vice President Pence was slated to head to Little Rock, Ark., and Memphis, Tenn., on Friday morning.

But the vice president cancelled the trip on little notice, and motored to the GOP’s “Capitol Hill Club,” a hangout just behind the Cannon House Office Building. A secretive huddle with members of the Freedom Caucus at the Capitol Hill Club would avoid reporters streaming through the Capitol.

Ryan then dashed off to the White House to meet with the president.

There would be no need for either event if the vote count was solid.

The magic number to pass a bill in the House was 216, with 430 sitting members and five vacancies. The number necessary for passage was expected to be a little lower as there are always absences. (Hey, you try getting 430 people in the same room at the same time). Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill.,  was out because his wife passed away.

The House usually conducts a series of “bed check” votes ahead of major issues on the floor. Such votes are often on parliamentary issues or non-controversial bills.

The checks enable leaders to determine how many members are actually present that day and also do final assessments of where members stand on an issue. On those roll calls, the total of members voting ranged between 422, 424 and 420. That meant the threshold to pass the health care bill could be 212, 213 or 211 yeas.

But the House was never within striking distance. If Republicans were within a vote or two, the GOP brass might be able to lug it across the finish line. But this bill was going to fail. Forging ahead with a roll call vote would put a lot of members on the record on a bill destined for the dust heap.

“It is going to be tattooed to you,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., warned Republicans on Wednesday night at the Rules Committee, looking in the GOP direction of the dais.

Everyone knew the gig was up around 3:30 p.m. et Friday. Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., presided over the House and recessed the chamber “subject to the call of the chair.”

The term means the House is out  but will meet again at an undetermined time. If everything was set, they’d hold the vote.

TV monitors all around the Capitol flipped onto a graphic known as the “screen of death.” The picture shows the Capitol Dome with a waving U.S. flag. The words “The House is in recess subject to the call of the chair” are emblazoned across the top.

Republicans failed.

The exercise underscored that the internecine schisms that divided Republicans during the presidential election and under the tutelage of former House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, still remain.

Some members think Boehner was no longer effective. Members of the Freedom Caucus helped nudge his departure in October 2015. Would things be different under Ryan?

Maybe. But not really. New speaker. Same membership.

Boehner often engineered a coalition of Democrats and Republicans to pass major legislation. Avoiding a government shutdown. Wrestling with the debt ceiling. But no Democrat was going to vote to repeal and replace ObamaCare. Republicans were on their own. And without help from the other side of the aisle, Ryan could never get to 216, 213, 212 or even 211 yeas.

“We had roughly 200 votes,” said House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden, R-Oregon, one of the authors of the GOP health care bill.

The question now is how much political capital did Republicans exhaust in this effort? They have to fund the government by April 28. A fight over the debt ceiling looms. Trump, Ryan and Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, say now it’s on to tax reform.

Damage for Ryan? 

When Boehner resigned, former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, R-Miss., surfaced at the Capitol one day and spoke of what led to Boehner’s exit.

“In the leadership, you take on barnacles like a ship at sea and they start to weight you down after battle,” said Lott, bounced from his post in 2002. “Once you get in the leadership, there ain’t no such thing as purity.”

Ryan’s ship certainly accumulated major barnacles in this fight.

And ObamaCare remains.

That’s because Republicans have divided government. Yes, they have the House, Senate and White House. But the GOP remains fractured and fratricidal.

So why was “repeal and replace” such an effective campaign tool for Republicans?

Perhaps it’s just that. A great campaign tool. Kind of like tax reform. What lawmaker doesn’t campaign on lowering taxes? Yet no major updates to the tax code in decades. How about abortion? Settled law. But both sides campaign on the issue and little changes.

Gun control? Democrats invoke the Columbine, Sandy Hook, San Bernardino and Orlando shooting massacres. A crazed gunman shot former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., in the head — ironically delaying the House GOP’s first vote to repeal ObamaCare in January 2011. Yet the firearms issue hasn’t evolved much since 1994. Both sides deploy guns as a campaign issue.

And so here we are with repealing and replacing ObamaCare.

The screen of death flashed on TV monitors all over the Capitol Friday afternoon. Repealing and replacing Obamacare was dead. And by nightfall, some Republican lawmakers were blasting out statements, pledging to continue the repeal and replace fight.

Campaign 2018 had begun.

Scuffle breaks out at pro-Trump rally in California

Mar 25, 2017 20

A scuffle broke out Saturday on a Southern California beach where supporters of President Donald Trump had gathered to march.

The Los Angeles Times reports that an anti-Trump protester allegedly doused the event’s organizer with pepper spray and was set upon in the sand by a group of Trump supporters.

KCBS-TV reports that fights broke out between pro-Trump supporters and anti-Trump protesters about half an hour after the noon event began at Bolsa Chica State Beach. Hundreds of people had gathered.

Counter-protesters said before the march began that they planned to try to stop its progress with a “human wall.”

Authorities could not immediately be reached for details about any arrests.

Earlier this month, a rally in Berkeley, California, in support of Trump turned violent and his supporters clashed with counter-protesters in several fights that led to the arrest of 10 people and left at least seven people injured.

Arrests after scuffle breaks out at California Trump rally

Mar 25, 2017 16

A scuffle broke out on a Southern California beach where supporters of President Donald Trump were marching when counter-protesters doused organizers with pepper spray, authorities said Saturday.

The violence erupted when the march of about 2,000 people at Bolsa Chica State Beach reached a group of about 30 counter-protesters, some of whom began spraying the irritant, said Capt. Kevin Pearsall of the California State Parks Police. Three people were arrested on suspicion of illegal use of pepper spray, he said.

There were several other arrests and two people suffered minor injuries, but Pearsall said he did not immediately have further details.

TRUMP SIGNALS NEW HOPE FOR OBAMACARE OVERHAUL, SAYS ‘DO NOT WORRY!’

The Los Angeles Times reported (goo.gl/3C88wT) that an anti-Trump protester who allegedly used the eye irritant was kicked and punched in the sand by a group of Trump supporters.

Counter-protesters said before the march began that they planned to try to stop the march’s progress with a “human wall.”

Earlier this month, a rally in Berkeley, California, in support of Trump turned violent and his supporters clashed with counter-protesters in several fights that led to the arrest of 10 people and left at least seven people injured.

Pence vows Trump will continue ObamaCare fight, calls out Democrats and Republicans

Mar 25, 2017 19

Vice President Pence tried Saturday to deliver a pep-talk to Americans after fellow Republicans’ failed effort to overhaul ObamaCare — admitting that members are “back to the drawing board” but vowing that President Trump will “keep fighting.”

Pence spoke in the aftermath of House Speaker Paul Ryan on Friday cancelling the final vote for the ObamaCare replacement bill, upon concluding he didn’t have enough votes despite the chamber’s GOP majority.

The Republican congressman and the president, after announcing the cancellation, sounded as if efforts to fulfill campaign promises to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law were essentially finished.

Ryan publicly said Americans would be living with ObamaCare for the “foreseeable future,” while Trump simply told The New York Times, “It’s enough already.”

However, Trump and Pence on Saturday seemed to come back fighting.

“ObamaCare will explode, and we will all get together and piece together a great healthcare plan for THE PEOPLE,” Trump tweeted. “Do not worry!”

Pence later said at a business event in Charleston, West Virginia, that small-business owners in the state repeatedly tell him about the need to dismantle ObamaCare because it “stifles growth” and slows job creation.

“President Trump is never going to stop fighting to keep his promises to the American people,” he said

He also argued those who claimed victory in Republicans’ failure Friday are merely championing the status quo and said, “I promise you, that victory won’t last for long.”

Pence also put pressure on West Virginia Sens. Shelley Moore Capito, a Republican, and Joe Manchin, a Democrat, to confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch as the next Supreme Court justice.

However, he also made clear that Gorsuch, Trump’s pick, would be confirmed “one way or another,” implying that Senate Republican leaders would invoke parliamentary tactics to win confirmation with a simple, 51-vote majority.

Pence was joined at the first event by Small Business Administration leader Linda McMahon, who helped start and run World Wrestling Entertainment.

“Maybe we could have used a couple of WWE superstars on Capitol Hill yesterday,” Pence, who did his share of arm-twisting for ObamaCare reform, said jokingly.

On Friday, after the vote was cancelled, Trump appeared to already be focusing on tax reform and returning to his plan to allow ObamaCare to continue — with the expectation that the 2010 health care law would implode amid increasing costs and dwindling options for Americans.

Still, his tweet Saturday suggested a potential willingness to work on a bipartisan plan on overhauling the law — albeit a scenario in which Democrats come to the GOP-controlled Congress to work together on improvements.

Late Friday, Tennessee GOP Sen. Bob Corker also suggested the fight to replace ObamaCare was not finished.

“At some point, on behalf of the American people, we have to resolve the issues that are driving up costs, limiting choices, and causing the individual market to spiral downward,” he said. “I stand ready to work with the administration and my colleagues on both sides of the aisle in order to fix our broken health care system.”

Ivanka Trump's D.C. neighbors irked by security, parking, garbage

Mar 25, 2017 16

Residents of a posh Washington neighborhood say Ivanka Trump and her family don’t make for very good neighbors, taking up much of the parking on an already crowded street and leaving trash bags at the curb for days. A big part of the complaint: a huge security presence, with even a trip to the playground requiring three vans.

Neighbors of Trump, her husband Jared Kushner and their three children have groused that sidewalks have been closed, public parking overrun and that the family and their staff haven’t learned the trash pickup schedule outside their $5.5-million home.

“It has been a three-ring circus from the day that they’ve moved in,” Marietta Robinson, who lives across the street, told with The Associated Press.

The house in the Kalorama neighborhood was bought in December by a company with ties to a Chilean billionaire. The company is renting it to Kushner and Trump, who moved in just after the inauguration of her father, President Donald Trump. Both work in the White House as advisers to the president.

Residents of the enclave of four- and five-story townhomes and elegant single-family properties about 2 miles north of the White House are accustomed to VIP neighbors. Former President Barack Obama and his family have lived there since he left office, and the Secret Service closed off their entire block to traffic. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos bought a home there, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson also moved in recently.

Yet no one has raised the ire of the community like the Trumps. At a recent neighborhood commission meeting, Fox News anchor Chris Wallace was among those who showed up to complain about parking problems.

Some in the neighborhood have also complained about the family’s rental arrangement. The company that owns the house didn’t obtain a rental license for two months, securing one just this week after it was warned by city regulators.

“Maybe some of the upset has to do with politics a little. I couldn’t say for sure, but I know that people don’t seem to be upset about Tillerson’s situation. It’s much less intrusive,” said Ellen Goldstein, an elected neighborhood commissioner.

The Secret Service has sole responsibility under law for protecting the family, but neighbors have noticed what they describe as an unusually large and aggressive security presence. Ivanka Trump arrives and departs in a four-vehicle motorcade, Robinson said.

“There are more of them than I have ever seen,” Robinson wrote in a letter to Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser and other city officials. “Frequently several of them are milling outside of the house at all hours having conversations and staring meanly at anyone in view.”

The letter — which also complained about parking, trash and noise — spurred the city government into action. On Friday morning, District transportation crews were outside the house, removing “No Parking” signs.

The department said no permits had been sought for parking exemptions or sidewalk closures on the street since Trump moved in. Yet vehicles associated with the Trump-Kushner house have been seen parking in the restricted areas for hours at a time, and barriers have been erected on the sidewalk in front of the house, forcing pedestrians to cross the street, next-door neighbor Rhona Wolfe Friedman said.

Even without extra restrictions, street parking for non-residents is limited to two hours.

“The parking patrol on Tracy Place has always been ultra-vigilant,” Robinson wrote to the mayor. “Suddenly, the parking enforcement has disappeared.”

A Secret Service spokeswoman, Nicole Mainor, said agency officials met with neighbors and city officials on Friday morning and addressed their concerns about parking and other disruptions. She declined to answer specific questions about the level of protection the family receives, citing agency policy.

It’s not clear whether Ivanka Trump is aware of any complaints, saying in a statement emailed Friday afternoon by an aide: “We love the neighborhood and our family has received an incredibly gracious welcome from our neighbors.”

Christopher Chapin, president of the neighborhood council — who doesn’t live as close as the neighbors who’ve complained — said all the attention is good for Kalorama.

“We are delighted to have political figures like the Obamas, the Kushners and the Tillersons living in our neighborhood,” he said.

Security, parking, garbage irk Ivanka Trump's D.C. neighbors

Mar 25, 2017 17

Residents of a posh Washington neighborhood say Ivanka Trump and her family don’t make for very good neighbors, taking up much of the parking on an already crowded street and leaving trash bags at the curb for days. A big part of the complaint: a huge security presence, with even a trip to the playground requiring three vans.

Neighbors of Trump, her husband Jared Kushner and their three children have groused that sidewalks have been closed, public parking overrun and that the family and their staff haven’t learned the trash pickup schedule outside their $5.5-million home.

“It has been a three-ring circus from the day that they’ve moved in,” Marietta Robinson, who lives across the street, told with The Associated Press.

The house in the Kalorama neighborhood was bought in December by a company with ties to a Chilean billionaire. The company is renting it to Kushner and Trump, who moved in just after the inauguration of her father, President Donald Trump. Both work in the White House as advisers to the president.

Residents of the enclave of four- and five-story townhomes and elegant single-family properties about 2 miles north of the White House are accustomed to VIP neighbors. Former President Barack Obama and his family have lived there since he left office, and the Secret Service closed off their entire block to traffic. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos bought a home there, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson also moved in recently.

Yet no one has raised the ire of the community like the Trumps. At a recent neighborhood commission meeting, Fox News anchor Chris Wallace was among those who showed up to complain about parking problems.

Some in the neighborhood have also complained about the family’s rental arrangement. The company that owns the house didn’t obtain a rental license for two months, securing one just this week after it was warned by city regulators.

“Maybe some of the upset has to do with politics a little. I couldn’t say for sure, but I know that people don’t seem to be upset about Tillerson’s situation. It’s much less intrusive,” said Ellen Goldstein, an elected neighborhood commissioner.

The Secret Service has sole responsibility under law for protecting the family, but neighbors have noticed what they describe as an unusually large and aggressive security presence. Ivanka Trump arrives and departs in a four-vehicle motorcade, Robinson said.

“There are more of them than I have ever seen,” Robinson wrote in a letter to Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser and other city officials. “Frequently several of them are milling outside of the house at all hours having conversations and staring meanly at anyone in view.”

The letter — which also complained about parking, trash and noise — spurred the city government into action. On Friday morning, District transportation crews were outside the house, removing “No Parking” signs.

The department said no permits had been sought for parking exemptions or sidewalk closures on the street since Trump moved in. Yet vehicles associated with the Trump-Kushner house have been seen parking in the restricted areas for hours at a time, and barriers have been erected on the sidewalk in front of the house, forcing pedestrians to cross the street, next-door neighbor Rhona Wolfe Friedman said.

Even without extra restrictions, street parking for non-residents is limited to two hours.

“The parking patrol on Tracy Place has always been ultra-vigilant,” Robinson wrote to the mayor. “Suddenly, the parking enforcement has disappeared.”

A Secret Service spokeswoman, Nicole Mainor, said agency officials met with neighbors and city officials on Friday morning and addressed their concerns about parking and other disruptions. She declined to answer specific questions about the level of protection the family receives, citing agency policy.

It’s not clear whether Ivanka Trump is aware of any complaints, saying in a statement emailed Friday afternoon by an aide: “We love the neighborhood and our family has received an incredibly gracious welcome from our neighbors.”

Christopher Chapin, president of the neighborhood council — who doesn’t live as close as the neighbors who’ve complained — said all the attention is good for Kalorama.

“We are delighted to have political figures like the Obamas, the Kushners and the Tillersons living in our neighborhood,” he said.

Trump signals new hope for ObamaCare overall, says 'Do not worry!'

Mar 25, 2017 18

President Trump hinted Saturday that overhauling ObamaCare is still alive, perhaps through a bipartisan deal, following the effort’s dramatic and seemingly terminal failure a day earlier.

“ObamaCare will explode and we will all get together and piece together a great healthcare plan for THE PEOPLE,” Trump tweeted. “Do not worry!”

Trump tweeted after House Speaker Paul Ryan on Friday cancelled the final vote for the ObamaCare replacement bill, upon concluding he didn’t have enough votes despite the chamber’s GOP majority.

“We’re going to be living with ObamaCare for the foreseeable future,” the Wisconsin Republican said afterward, making clear that neither he nor President Trump intend to introduce new legislation.

Meanwhile, Trump appeared to already be turning his attention to tax reform and returning to his plan to allow ObamaCare to continue — with the expectation that the 2010 health care law would implode amid increasing costs and few options for Americans.

Still, his tweet Saturday suggested a potentially willingness to work on a bipartisan plan on overhauling ObamaCare — albeit a scenario in which Democrats come to the GOP-controlled Congress to work together on improvement.

The Republican divided that doomed the party’s ObamaCare replacement bill appears as equally wide in the aftermath, with leaders in disagreement about the next step.

Ohio Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan on Saturday seemed open to such discussions, acknowledging that ObamaCare indeed has problems, including too few tax credits for poor Americans to help pay for the insurance.

“ObamaCare is not perfect. We need to fix things” he said on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends.” “This is all fixable if we sit down as reasonable people.”

Louisiana GOP Sen. Bill Cassidy told Fox News’ “America’s News Headquarters” on Saturday that he agrees with Trump’s tweet, suggesting a bipartisan effort. 

Trump signals new hope for ObamaCare overhaul, says 'Do not worry!'

Mar 25, 2017 16

President Trump hinted Saturday that overhauling ObamaCare is still alive, perhaps through a bipartisan deal, following the effort’s dramatic and seemingly terminal failure a day earlier.

“ObamaCare will explode and we will all get together and piece together a great healthcare plan for THE PEOPLE,” Trump tweeted. “Do not worry!”

Trump tweeted after House Speaker Paul Ryan on Friday cancelled the final vote for the ObamaCare replacement bill, upon concluding he didn’t have enough votes despite the chamber’s GOP majority.

“We’re going to be living with ObamaCare for the foreseeable future,” the Wisconsin Republican said afterward, making clear that neither he nor Trump intend to introduce new legislation.

Meanwhile, Trump appeared to already be turning his attention to tax reform and returning to his plan to allow ObamaCare to continue — with the expectation that the 2010 health care law would implode amid increasing costs and few options for Americans.

Still, his tweet Saturday suggested a potential willingness to work on a bipartisan plan on overhauling ObamaCare — albeit a scenario in which Democrats come to the GOP-controlled Congress to work together on improvements.

Ohio Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan on Saturday seemed open to such discussions, acknowledging that ObamaCare indeed has problems, including too few tax credits for poor Americans to help them pay for the insurance.

“ObamaCare is not perfect. We need to fix things” he said on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends.” “This is all fixable if we sit down as reasonable people.”

Louisiana GOP Sen. Bill Cassidy told Fox News’ “America’s News Headquarters” on Saturday that he agrees with Trump’s tweet, suggesting a bipartisan effort.