Annual Chincoteague pony swim set for Wednesday

Jul 26, 2017 7

The 92 annual Chincoteague pony penning is set for Wednesday.

Organizers say the wild ponies of Assateague Island will swim across to Chincoteague sometime between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m.

The event draws thousands of tourists each year and was memorialized in Marguerite Henry’s novel “Misty of Chincoteague.”

An auction of a portion of the herd benefits the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Department.

Hearing set for Mississippi man charged with killing 8

Jul 26, 2017 8

A Mississippi man charged with killing eight people is set to make a court appearance.

Willie Cory Godbolt has been jailed without bond since his arrest May 28, shortly after the fatal shootings of a sheriff’s deputy and seven others who were Godbolt’s relatives or acquaintances.

The killings May 27 and 28 occurred at three homes in and around the south Mississippi city of Brookhaven, about 70 miles (110 kilometers) south of Jackson. A deputy responded to a disturbance call at Godbolt’s in-laws’ home, where witnesses say Godbolt was arguing with his estranged wife, and the shootings started there.

Deputy William Durr, Godbolt’s mother-in-law Barbara Mitchell and two others were killed at the first home in the small town of Bogue Chitto (BOH’-guh CHIT’-uh). An 11-year-old and an 18-year-old, who were each other’s cousins, were killed at the second home, in Brookhaven. A husband and wife were killed at the third home, also in Brookhaven.

Defense attorney Gus Sermos said Godbolt is scheduled to attend Wednesday’s hearing, where prosecutors will ask a judge to send the case to a grand jury for the possibility of indictment.

Godbolt is charged with one count of capital murder, which could carry the death penalty, in the deputy’s killing. He’s also charged with seven counts of murder, which could carry life without parole.

Moments after he was arrested May 28, a handcuffed Godbolt told a reporter from The Clarion-Ledger, on video, that someone in the first house called law enforcement while he was talking to his wife and in-laws about his wish to take his children home.

“My pain wasn’t designed for him. He was just there,” Godbolt said of the deputy.

Godbolt also said in the video: “My intentions was to have God kill me. I ran out of bullets. Suicide by cop was my intention. I ain’t fit to live, not after what I done.”

___

Follow Emily Wagster Pettus on Twitter: http://twitter.com/EWagsterPettus .

US Muslims see friendly neighbors, but a foe in White House

Jul 26, 2017 10

U.S. Muslims say they have experienced widespread suspicion about their faith in the first months of Donald Trump’s presidency, but also have received more support from individual Americans, and remain hopeful they can eventually be fully accepted in American society, a new survey finds.

Nearly three-quarters of U.S. Muslims view Trump as unfriendly to them, according to a Pew Research Center report released Wednesday. Sixty-two percent say Americans do not view Islam as part of the mainstream after a presidential election that saw a surge in hostility toward Muslims and immigrants.

At the same time, nearly half of Muslims said they had received expressions of encouragement from non-Muslims in the past year, an increase over past polls. And Muslims remain optimistic about their future. Seventy percent believe hard work can bring success in America, a figure largely unchanged for a decade.

“There’s a sense among the American Muslim population that others are beginning to understand them and beginning to sympathize with them,'” said Amaney Jamal, a Princeton University political scientist and adviser to Pew researchers. Prejudice against Muslims has “pushed the average American to say, ‘This is really not fair. I’m going to knock on my neighbor’s door to see if they’re all right,” Jamal said.

The Pew survey is its third on American Muslims since 2007, and its first since Trump took office Jan. 20. He promised to fight terrorism through “extreme vetting” of refugees and had a plan to temporarily ban travelers from six Muslim-majority countries.

The latest poll of 1,001 adults was conducted by phone, both landline and cellphones, between Jan. 23 and May 2, in English, Arabic, Farsi and Urdu, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 5.8 percentage points.

The last several months have seen an uptick in reports of anti-Muslim harassment, including arson and vandalism at mosques and bullying at schools. In the Pew survey, nearly half of U.S. Muslims say they have faced some discrimination in the last year, such as being treated with distrust, threatened or called an offensive name. That percentage is only a slight increase over previous surveys.

However, the figure is much higher for respondents who said they were more visibly identified as Muslim, for example by a head covering, or hijab, for women. Sixty-four percent of those with a more distinct Muslim identity said they had recently faced some type of discrimination.

Still, the survey found evidence of a growing sense of Muslim belonging in the United States. Eighty-nine percent said they were proud be both Muslim and American and nearly two-thirds said there was no conflict between Islam and democracy.

A larger share of American Muslims told Pew they had registered to vote and actually voted. Forty-four percent of Muslims eligible to vote cast ballots in last year’s presidential election, compared to 37 percent in 2007. Those numbers on Muslim voting are compared to 60 percent of eligible voters overall who cast ballots in 2016.”

American Muslim leaders, alarmed by anti-Muslim rhetoric in the campaign, made an unprecedented push to register voters in mosques and at community events. Turnout overall was higher after the highly contested 2016 campaign.

Muslims overwhelmingly backed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, who drew 78 percent of their vote compared to 8 percent for Trump.

Following a trend found in other American faith groups, a slight majority of U.S. Muslims now accept homosexuality, a dramatic reversal from a decade ago when 61 percent said same-sex relationships should be discouraged.

Pew researchers estimate the number of U.S. Muslims has been growing by 100,000 per year, reaching 3.35 million, or 1 percent of the American population. Just over half of U.S. Muslims identify as Sunni, while 16 percent say they are Shiite. Nearly six in 10 adult American Muslims were born outside the U.S.

The largest share of immigrants come from South Asian countries such as Pakistan, India and Bangladesh, while others have come from Iraq, Iran, sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. American-born blacks comprise about 13 percent of all Muslims in America, but their share is shrinking. Overall, eight in 10 are U.S. citizens, according to the survey.

Eight in 10 American Muslims said they were concerned about Islamic extremism and more than 70 percent said they were very or somewhat concerned about Islamic extremism in the U.S. However, three of 10 said that most of those arrested recently on suspicion of planning a terrorist attack had been tricked by law enforcement authorities and did not represent a real threat.

US Muslims see friendly neighbors, but a foe in White House

Jul 26, 2017 7

U.S. Muslims say they have experienced widespread suspicion about their faith in the first months of Donald Trump’s presidency, but also have received more support from individual Americans, and remain hopeful they can eventually be fully accepted in American society, a new survey finds.

Nearly three-quarters of U.S. Muslims view Trump as unfriendly to them, according to a Pew Research Center report released Wednesday. Sixty-two percent say Americans do not view Islam as part of the mainstream after a presidential election that saw a surge in hostility toward Muslims and immigrants.

At the same time, nearly half of Muslims said they had received expressions of encouragement from non-Muslims in the past year, an increase over past polls. And Muslims remain optimistic about their future. Seventy percent believe hard work can bring success in America, a figure largely unchanged for a decade.

“There’s a sense among the American Muslim population that others are beginning to understand them and beginning to sympathize with them,'” said Amaney Jamal, a Princeton University political scientist and adviser to Pew researchers. Prejudice against Muslims has “pushed the average American to say, ‘This is really not fair. I’m going to knock on my neighbor’s door to see if they’re all right,” Jamal said.

The Pew survey is its third on American Muslims since 2007, and its first since Trump took office Jan. 20. He promised to fight terrorism through “extreme vetting” of refugees and had a plan to temporarily ban travelers from six Muslim-majority countries.

The latest poll of 1,001 adults was conducted by phone, both landline and cellphones, between Jan. 23 and May 2, in English, Arabic, Farsi and Urdu, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 5.8 percentage points.

The last several months have seen an uptick in reports of anti-Muslim harassment, including arson and vandalism at mosques and bullying at schools. In the Pew survey, nearly half of U.S. Muslims say they have faced some discrimination in the last year, such as being treated with distrust, threatened or called an offensive name. That percentage is only a slight increase over previous surveys.

However, the figure is much higher for respondents who said they were more visibly identified as Muslim, for example by a head covering, or hijab, for women. Sixty-four percent of those with a more distinct Muslim identity said they had recently faced some type of discrimination.

Still, the survey found evidence of a growing sense of Muslim belonging in the United States. Eighty-nine percent said they were proud be both Muslim and American and nearly two-thirds said there was no conflict between Islam and democracy.

A larger share of American Muslims told Pew they had registered to vote and actually voted. Forty-four percent of Muslims eligible to vote cast ballots in last year’s presidential election, compared to 37 percent in 2007. Those numbers on Muslim voting are compared to 60 percent of eligible voters overall who cast ballots in 2016.”

American Muslim leaders, alarmed by anti-Muslim rhetoric in the campaign, made an unprecedented push to register voters in mosques and at community events. Turnout overall was higher after the highly contested 2016 campaign.

Muslims overwhelmingly backed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, who drew 78 percent of their vote compared to 8 percent for Trump.

Following a trend found in other American faith groups, a slight majority of U.S. Muslims now accept homosexuality, a dramatic reversal from a decade ago when 61 percent said same-sex relationships should be discouraged.

Pew researchers estimate the number of U.S. Muslims has been growing by 100,000 per year, reaching 3.35 million, or 1 percent of the American population. Just over half of U.S. Muslims identify as Sunni, while 16 percent say they are Shiite. Nearly six in 10 adult American Muslims were born outside the U.S.

The largest share of immigrants come from South Asian countries such as Pakistan, India and Bangladesh, while others have come from Iraq, Iran, sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. American-born blacks comprise about 13 percent of all Muslims in America, but their share is shrinking. Overall, eight in 10 are U.S. citizens, according to the survey.

Eight in 10 American Muslims said they were concerned about Islamic extremism and more than 70 percent said they were very or somewhat concerned about Islamic extremism in the U.S. However, three of 10 said that most of those arrested recently on suspicion of planning a terrorist attack had been tricked by law enforcement authorities and did not represent a real threat.

MORNING BRIEF: 9 Senate Republicans vote against latest repeal, replace ObamaCare proposal

Jul 26, 2017 7

The Senate has blocked a wide-ranging proposal by Republicans to repeal much of former President Barack Obama’s health care law and replace it with a more restrictive plan.

Senators voted 57-43 late Tuesday to reject the plan in the first vote on an amendment to the bill. Those voting “no” included nine defecting Republicans.

CHARLIE GARD 

First, a British judge told a dying baby’s parents they could not take their child to the U.S. for experimental treatment. On Wednesday a judge may tell them the infant cannot die at the family’s home in London, but in a hospice instead.

At a hearing in London, a British high court judge is scheduled to decide where the life of 11-month-old Charlie Gard will end.

Display nothing; This is on Publish with no configured Image

CLOCK IS TICKING 

A leading North Korea expert said the country is a year and a half away from creating a nuclear missile capable of reaching the United States.

Some time in the next year, North Korea expert Gordon Chang told Fox News, “they will have a nuclear missile capable of hitting the United States and we will have to make a decision about how we deter North Korea.”

COMING UP ON FOX BUSINESS: Ronna Romney McDaniel, Republican National Committee chairwoman, will be on ‘Mornings with Maria’ at 8 AM ET

TEA, ANYONE?

The IRS said Tuesday it has reached an agreement on guidelines for how to determine whether the Texas Patriots Tea Party should be granted nonprofit status, The Washington Times reported.

The agreement — roughly eight years in the making — does not guarantee the conservative group’s nonprofit application will be approved or declined.

MORNING BRIEF: 9 Senate Republicans vote against latest repeal, replace ObamaCare proposal

Jul 26, 2017 10

The Senate has blocked a wide-ranging proposal by Republicans to repeal much of former President Barack Obama’s health care law and replace it with a more restrictive plan.

Senators voted 57-43 late Tuesday to reject the plan in the first vote on an amendment to the bill. Those voting “no” included nine defecting Republicans.

CHARLIE GARD 

First, a British judge told a dying baby’s parents they could not take their child to the U.S. for experimental treatment. On Wednesday a judge may tell them the infant cannot die at the family’s home in London, but in a hospice instead.

At a hearing in London, a British high court judge is scheduled to decide where the life of 11-month-old Charlie Gard will end.

Display nothing; This is on Publish with no configured Image

CLOCK IS TICKING 

A leading North Korea expert said the country is a year and a half away from creating a nuclear missile capable of reaching the United States.

Some time in the next year, North Korea expert Gordon Chang told Fox News, “they will have a nuclear missile capable of hitting the United States and we will have to make a decision about how we deter North Korea.”

COMING UP ON FOX BUSINESS: Ronna Romney McDaniel, Republican National Committee chairwoman, will be on ‘Mornings with Maria’ at 8 AM ET

TEA, ANYONE?

The IRS said Tuesday it has reached an agreement on guidelines for how to determine whether the Texas Patriots Tea Party should be granted nonprofit status, The Washington Times reported.

The agreement — roughly eight years in the making — does not guarantee the conservative group’s nonprofit application will be approved or declined.

Mom and son convicted of killing husband, pouring acid on his face

Jul 26, 2017 10

A New York woman and one of her sons were found guilty Tuesday of killing her estranged husband and pouring acid on his face to make identifying him more difficult before the body was dumped in the woods.

A Rochester jury convicted Laura Rideout, 46, and Colin Rideout of second-degree murder in the slaying of 50-year-old Craig Rideout. The mother and son were also found guilty of evidence tampering.

“This was definitely one of the most heinous cases I’ve seen in my more than 30 years in law enforcement,” Monroe County Sheriff Patrick O’Flynn, who investigated the murder case, said, according to the Democrat and Chronicle. “To see someone so horrendously murder their own flesh and blood is unbelievable.”

Alexander Rideout, Laura’s son and Colin’s brother, was acquitted of murder charges but convicted of evidence tampering. Laura Rideout’s 51-year-old boyfriend, Paul Tucci, was acquitted on both charges.

All four were charged with second-degree murder after Craig Rideout’s tarp-covered body was found in the woods in the Finger Lakes region. Prosecutors said he had been strangled and beaten inside his suburban Penfield home on July 20, 2016, while the couple was going through a contentious divorce.

Alexander and Colin are two of the couple’s seven children. Sentencing was scheduled for Sept. 1.

The verdict resulted in mixed feelings for Agnes Rideout, Craig Rideout’s mother.

“Justice for my son, but those are my grandkids,” she told the Democrat and Chronicle.

Craig Rideout’s mutilated body was found wrapped in a tarp off a rural road in a Finger Lakes town about 40 miles southeast of Rochester. A man stumbled upon it and alerted police. As investigators gathered evidence at the scene, they heard a phone ringing. It turned out to be Craig Rideout’s cellphone, which the killers had overlooked in his pocket. The discovery helped identify his body.

The evidence presented during the three-week trial included video footage from a Walmart where Colin Rideout bought a shovel and four pairs of work gloves on the day prosecutors said Craig Rideout was killed. A day earlier, Laura Rideout and Tucci bought drain cleaner, a tarp and bungee cords at another store.

A shovel similar to the one bought at Walmart was found near Craig Rideout’s body, while four pairs of similar work gloves were found covered with the victim’s blood.

Police initially charged Laura Rideout with evidence tampering after her husband’s body was found. Soon afterward sons Alexander, 20, and Colin, 23, were arrested on the same charges after witnesses told police they saw the brothers throwing a bag with solvents, gloves and drain cleaner into a pond at a suburban Rochester park the day after the slaying.

The mother, two sons and Tucci were later charged with second-degree murder.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Empowerment center to open in Ferguson at burned store site

Jul 26, 2017 16

The president of the National Urban League says he’s seen “steps in the right direction” in Ferguson, Missouri, in the three years since Michael Brown’s death, and he’s hopeful the new Ferguson Community Empowerment Center will help even more.

The $3 million center was built on property where a QuikTrip convenience store was burned during rioting after the 18-year-old Brown, who was black and unarmed, was killed by a white police officer on Aug. 9, 2014. The center that will house a job training and placement service opens Wednesday — the same day the Urban League starts its national conference in St. Louis.

National Urban League President Michael Morial says the events in Ferguson after Brown’s death highlighted challenges many communities face, including poverty and disparities in education and health.

Father of tennis star Mark Philippoussis held on child-sex charges

Jul 26, 2017 16

The father of retired Australian tennis star Mark Philippoussis has been arrested in California on charges of molesting two minors to whom he provided tennis lessons.

Nikolaos Philippoussis, 68, was arrested Tuesday at his home in Mira Mesa, California, San Diego County Sheriff’s Lt. Greg Rylaarsdam told Fox 5 San Diego. No other specifics about the case were provided.

“We’ve developed probable cause to believe that this did in fact occur,” Rylaarsdam told the local news station.

Philippoussis was booked on suspicion of committing lewd acts and faces several additional charges, includes lewd and lascivious acts on a person under age 14 and having sex with a child age 10 or younger. He is being held on $2.5 million bail pending arraignment, which is scheduled for Wednesday.

“[He] works as a personal tennis coach … and the alleged molestation victims took tennis lessons from him,” Rylaarsdam told Australian broadcaster ABC.

San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said police were looking for “more victims.”

Philippoussis’ son is a former Davis Cup champion and one-time Wimbledon finalist. The father coached Mark during his pro career, where he reached a career-high world singles ranking of No. 8.

The younger Philippoussis won two Davis Cup titles with Australia, in 1999 and 2003. He retired in 2015.

In 2006, Mark opted to go it alone, with reports at the time suggesting he could no longer take his father’s “interfering ways,” the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

“Let me tell you, that stuff’s ridiculous,” Philippoussis said after losing to world No. 2 Rafael Nadal in the first round at the U.S. Open in New York in 2006, according to the Australian newspaper. “It’s frustrating when I hear that stuff because I’m a tennis player and athlete. Someone wants to write about my tennis, great. It’s unfortunate when I have to read things about my personal life and my family.

“My dad’s my dad. He’s been there from the start. Without him, I wouldn’t be where I am. There’s nothing at all that’s happened with my dad. I just needed to spend some time on my own.”

Perry Chiaramonte is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter at @perrych

Dad arrested after allegedly leaving 16-day-old son in California parking lot

Jul 26, 2017 12

A newborn was in critical but stable condition Tuesday after his teenage father abandoned him in a Northern California strip-mall parking lot, police said.

The father, Daniel Mitchell, 18, drove into the lot in Suisun City on Monday, removed a car seat holding the 16-day-old boy, put it on the ground and left, police said after viewing surveillance video and interviewing witnesses.

Two employees from a barber shop noticed the child car seat sitting unattended, and on closer inspection they found a baby in it and called police. Police were able to get the vehicle’s license plate from surveillance video and identify Mitchell.

He was involved in a hit-and-run crash and hospitalized later Monday in nearby Fairfield, and police found him there and confirmed he was the father.

Police arrested Mitchell on suspicion of child endangerment, child abandonment, committing a felony while free on bail and misdemeanor possession of suspected cocaine.

The baby was airlifted to a children’s hospital and was in critical but stable condition. The Los Angeles Times reported that the infant suffered from a condition that required specialized care.

Police said they have found and interviewed the boy’s mother, but she is not considered a suspect.

The Associated Press contributed to this report