Florida boy, 10, arrested 4 times in 6 weeks for allegedly stealing cars

Jul 22, 2017 14

A 10-year-old Florida boy was arrested Wednesday for allegedly stealing a car the day after he was charged with snatching another vehicle.

The boy, whom Daytona Beach Police described as “flashy,” was caught cutting off his ankle monitor less than six hours after it was placed on him and meeting up with other teenagers to steal a car, authorities said.

TEENS FILMED, LAUGHED WHILE MAN SLOWLY DROWNED, AUTHORITIES SAY

Police said it was his fourth arrest for car theft in six weeks.

Daytona Beach Police Sgt. Tim Ehrenkaufer told The Daytona Beach News-Journal that investigators have noticed a brashness that’s not common in children that young.

“He has a look-at-me attitude,” Ehrenkaufer said. “He’s flashy.”

Capt. Jennifer Krosschell said the boy looks his age despite his brash behavior.

“He even looks like a 10-year-old,” Krosschell said. “When we [seized] the car he had stolen, the driver’s seat was pushed up to the steering wheel.”

POUNDS OF PORK PLOP ONTO ROOF OF FLORIDA HOME

He was first arrested in June after police said he stole a car. Since then, the child has been connected to two other car robberies.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Reward tops $100K: Where did it come from and who gets it?

Jul 22, 2017 21

When two Georgia inmates escaped from a prison bus leaving two dead guards in their wake, the reward for information leading to their capture rose quickly.

During a prison transfer early on June 13, Ricky Dubose and Donnie Rowe overpowered Sgt. Christopher Monica and Sgt. Curtis Billue, authorities said. The pair then carjacked the first driver to pull up behind the bus on a lonely stretch of highway in Putnam County and fled in his green Honda Civic.

There was evidence they ransacked a home in Madison, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) to the north, a few hours later and stole a pickup from a nearby quarry, but that’s where the trail ran cold.

Two days later, with no new clues and an intense manhunt underway, Putnam County Sheriff Howard Sills announced that the reward had climbed to an unusually high $130,000.

Within hours, the two were in custody in Tennessee after holding a couple hostage in a violent home invasion near Shelbyville, leading deputies on a high-speed chase and then surrendering to a homeowner near the community of Christiana, authorities said.

That’s when everyone started asking about the reward.

___

HOW MUCH MONEY WAS IT?

By the time the two shirtless, heavily tattooed suspects were taken into custody on June 15, the reward had risen to $141,000, Sills said. But that money wasn’t all sitting in a bank account ready to be handed out. It existed in the form of pledges.

___

WHERE DID THE MONEY COME FROM?

Sills got the ball rolling, putting up $10,000 from his office right after the escape. Other pledges began coming in right away, and Sills’ office kept him updated on the latest tally as he focused on the investigation.

___

WHO GAVE WHAT?

— $20,000 each: FBI; Georgia Bureau of Investigation;

— $15,000: New York State Correctional Officers and Police Benevolent Association;

— $10,000 each: Putnam County Sheriff’s Office; Butts County Sheriff’s Office; Green County Sheriff’s Office; Northern Judicial Circuit District Attorney’s Office; anonymous private individual;

— $5,000 each: Georgia Department of Corrections; Spalding County Sheriff’s Office; Oconee County Sheriff’s Office; Georgia Fraternal Order of Police; U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; CorrectHealth; Georgia Sheriffs’ Association;

— $1,000: Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police.

___

WHO’S GETTING THE MONEY?

Authorities won’t say exactly who’s getting it.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation announced on June 23, just over a week after the arrests, that it would split its $20,000 in reward money evenly between two households in Tennessee but said the recipients’ names were being withheld at their request.

The two federal agencies, the FBI and ATF, planned to distribute their money themselves, but neither agency would say who would get the money or how it would be divided.

The rest of the donors decided to let Sills figure out how to distribute the money, a total of $96,000. Checks started coming in within days, and he got the final one Monday. He decided to give $5,000 to one person involved in the case and then to divide the remaining $91,000 equally between two households in Tennessee and a confidential informant, with each getting $30,334 (Sills threw in $2 from his own pocket to make the amount nice and even).

___

IS THAT KIND OF SECRECY NORMAL?

Yes. Anonymity, even more than money, is a key factor in getting people to call in tips, said Barb Bergin, who chairs the board of Crime Stoppers USA, which has programs around the country that offer rewards for anonymous tips that lead to arrests. In fact, she said, the rewards often go unclaimed by people who have called in valuable tips.

“People aren’t calling for the money,” Bergin said. “They are calling for the anonymity.”

California man sues lottery over denied $5M Scratcher winnings

Jul 22, 2017 23

A California man sued the state and California Lottery Commission alleging he was wrongfully denied a $5 million Scratchers ticket prize because his 16-year-old son bought the winning ticket.

Ward Thomas filed a lawsuit with the Los Angeles Superior Court claiming the commission’s failure to discharge a mandatory duty, breach of contract, negligence and both intentional and negligent representation. The suit seeks unspecified damages.

CALIFORNIA TEEN WINS LOTTERY TWICE IN ONE WEEK

A California Lottery representative did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

Thomas says his son bought five Scratchers tickets at a Mobil station on Bellflower Boulevard in Long Beach on Oct. 16 by exchanging other winning tickets. One of the five was a winning ticket with a $5 million prize, the suit
states.

Thomas validated the ticket at a 7-Eleven store in Long Beach that same day and then validated it again the next day at the lottery office in Santa Ana, the suit states.

However, on Dec. 5, the Lottery  Commission told Thomas that his award was being denied because his son was a minor and therefore was “not legally able to play the lottery,” the suit states.

Read more at Fox 11.

Powerball winner stunned, winds up in hospital with case of 'euphoria'

Jul 22, 2017 17

A man in New Zealand who won millions in the Powerball jackpot had to be rushed to the hospital for what his doctor called “a case of euphoria.”

Lou Te Keeti saw an email Sunday from MyLotto saying he had won, but figured it was a minor prize. When he finally called, Te Keeti found out he’d hit the $10.3 million ($7.67 million U.S.) jackpot.

Still, it didn’t seem real.

“I hadn’t really believed it until it hit my bank account. I was still thinking this might be a hoax,” he told the New Zealand Herald.

MEXICAN IMMIGRANT COOK WINS $7 MILLION LOTTO JACKPOT IN NEW YORK

Then, he said, he saw several zeroes added to one of his accounts and thought, “Whoa, this is for real.”

Te Keeti, of Tauranga, a coastal town on the North Island, told the newspaper that he still headed off to do his usual grocery shopping, but started to have “flutters.”

“I was feeling not myself, quite strange, and they got me in an ambulance and I had all these tests and stayed a night in Tauranga Hospital.”

The Herald reported that he didn’t tell the doctors who treated him that he had just won, but one doctor told him he had “a case of euphoria.”

Te Keeti, who is in his 70s, is planning a special 50th anniversary wedding celebration next year with his wife, Val, their four adult children and seven grandchildren.

He also said he will use his winnings to take care of his family, his church and his community.

DREAMING OF LOTTO WIN MAY BENEFIT HEALTH

It took time for his wife, Val, to get used to the big win, too. Te Keeti made plans to replace their home of 30 years, where they had raised their family, with a much larger place.

“I thought I would surprise Val by giving her a dream house and got all these plans to get architects and designers and what not,” he said to the Herald.

But instead, she told him to “get stuffed with my fancy plans.” Te Keeti said she touched the walls of their home and said, “Lou, a big fancy house, that is not us, this is us.”

He said he doesn’t want a lot of material things, but needs a new car and also wants to help fix the pathways in the community’s cemetery.

In addition to setting aside money for some charities, he and his wife have always wanted to go to the Melbourne Cup, and Te Keeti, who used to play golf but had to give it up, would like to take it up again. They may also breed thoroughbreds, a breed they have always loved.

“It is a passion that brings us together, so we will do that,” he said.

Ohio prosecutor: Infant whose remains found was born alive

Jul 22, 2017 18

A prosecutor says an infant whose remains were found buried in southwestern Ohio was born alive.

Eighteen-year-old Brooke Skylar Richardson is charged with reckless homicide in the baby’s death. Warren County Prosecutor David Fornshell said Friday that the charge was based upon evidence that the infant was “born alive and was not a stillborn baby.”

The remains were found July 14 near a home in Carlisle, about 40 miles (64 kilometers) north of Cincinnati.

Franklin Municipal Court judge on Friday continued the Carlisle woman’s $15,000 bond. A not-guilty plea was entered for her.

Richardson’s attorney, Charles Rittgers, said outside court that Richardson is “a very good person.” He declined to comment further on the case until he can review it.

Fornshell says the investigation is continuing.

Hawaii grand jury indicts US soldier on terrorism charges for trying to aid ISIS

Jul 22, 2017 15

A federal grand in Hawaii indicted a U.S. soldier on Friday for allegedly attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State group.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Ikaika Kang, 34, was arrested by an FBI SWAT team on July 8. Kang was ordered held without bail. Kang was employed at Schofield Barracks in Hawaii.

Kang will be arraigned in federal court on Monday, which is when he had previously been scheduled for a preliminary hearing. Kang’s court-appointed attorney, Birney Bervar, told The Associated Press Friday that the indictment was expected.

BUDGET BOSS MULVANEY CLAIMS OBAMA HAD ‘SECRET LIST’ OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS

“We haven’t had a preliminary in federal court here in probably 25 years,” Bervar told The Associated Press. “They don’t like to let us question their witnesses.”

Bervar said the soldier would plead not guilty on Monday when a federal judge will set a trial date.

Bervar said Kang’s mental state was never the same following his 2011 deployment.

“He’s a decorated American soldier for 10 years, goes to Afghanistan and comes back and things start going off the rails.”

According to an FBI affidavit, Kang’s behavior was obvious to those around him, the Washington Post reported.

USS FITZGERALD COLLISION: CREW ‘SHOULD HAVE SPOKEN UP’ BEFORE ACCIDENT, OFFICIAL SAYS

“He was reprimanded on several occasions for threatening to hurt or kill other service members, and for arguing pro-ISIS views while at work and on-post,” according to the affidavit. “Due to these remarks and threats, Kang’s security clearance was revoked in 2012, but reinstated the following year after Kang complied with military requirements stemming from the investigation.”

Elliot Enoki, acting U.S. attorney for the District of Hawaii, and Dana Boente, acting assistant attorney general for national security, announced the indictment in a statement.

Kang has been charged with four counts of attempting to provide material support to ISIS based on events that occurred in Hawaii between June 21 and July 8, they said.

Federal officials said Kang met with undercover FBI agents he thought were with the terror group and provided classified military documents to the agents.

According to the affidavit, Kang provided the materials hoping the documents “would assist ISIS, including with fighting and military tactics. Additionally, Kang contributed to the purchase of a drone with the intention that it would be provided to, and used by, ISIS during fighting.”

The FBI said in their criminal complaint that Kang wanted to commit a mass shooting after allegedly pledging allegiance to ISIS.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Texas 'bathroom bill' advances out of Senate committee

Jul 22, 2017 20

In an 8-1 vote, a Texas state Senate committee agreed Friday to advance a measure to restrict public restroom use by transgender people, despite 10 hours of testimony from opponents of the bill, the Texas Tribune reported.

Senate Bill 3, a so-called “bathroom bill,” would regulate public school facilities, open-enrollment charter school facilities, and local government restrooms to be “used only by persons of the same sex as stated on a person’s birth certificate.” It will now advance to the full Senate for consideration.

The measure is expected to pass and be sent to the House. Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, is said to back the measure, which is sponsored by GOP state Sen. Lois Kolkhorst.

Republicans say the measure would help protect restroom users against sexual predators, but Democrats argue that it discriminates against transgender people.

Debate surrounding the bill has already cost the state $66 million in convention business, and that figure could rise to roughly $1.4 billion if more sports, conventions and other events are canceled, .

A similar bill in North Carolina cost that state hundreds of millions of dollars and led to the relocation of this year’s NBA All-Star Weekend from Charlotte to New Orleans.

In March, North Carolina repealed its bathroom law, and in May the NBA agreed to hold its event in Charlotte in 2019.

Prior to Friday’s vote, leaders of the National Episcopal Church voiced their concerns, encouraging Texas House Speaker Joe Straus in a letter to continue his stance against any proposed bathroom bill.Reuters reported

Kolkhorst took a jab at an Obama-era federal policy that provided protections for transgender students in public schools. That policy has since been removed by the Trump administration.

“We’re here today because Texas has a tradition of taking care of these issues and not being dictated to by the federal government,” Kolkhorst said.

This is the Lone Star State’s second attempt to pass a bathroom bill. Straus had helped block the previous effort, the Tribune reported.

Hutchison, Trump's pick for NATO envoy, seems headed for confirmation

Jul 22, 2017 25

Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, a Republican and former U.S. senator from Texas, appears on track to win Senate confirmation as President Trump’s choice for U.S. ambassador to NATO, the Texas Tribune reported this week.

Hutchison, 74, whom Trump nominated in June, faced questioning at a hearing Thursday before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and appeared to have bipartisan support.

Her backers included Sens. John Cornyn and Ted Cruz, both R-Texas, and Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., who was Hillary Clinton’s running mate in the 2016 presidential election.

“Few statesmen have the qualifications, the relationships, and gravitas that Senator Hutchison brings to this position,” Cruz told the panel. “After years of inadequate resourcing, Kay led an effort in the Senate to rebuild our military and helped prepare it to meet the new, more stringent demands of the global war on terror.”

Cruz succeeded Hutchison in the Senate, where the nominee served from 1993 to 2013.

Added Kaine: “Kay Bailey, I’m so excited you’re the nominee. Your nomination sends a signal the NATO relationship is an important one.”

Hutchison used part of her testimony Thursday to assure committee members that, if confirmed to represent the U.S. in the Western military alliance, she intended to take a tough stance on Russia, the Tribune reported.

“We are beefing up defenses for an aggressive Russia,” she told the committee, adding that she backs members of Congress who are considering new sanctions against Russia in response to its cyberattacks.

Several senators said they found Hutchison’s positions reassuring, given concerns on Capitol Hill about Trump’s relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, the Tribune reported.

In her testimony, Hutchison said it was likely that Russia interfered in the 2016 American elections, a conclusion that aligns with a consensus among the country’s intelligence agencies.

If confirmed for the ambassadorship, Hutchison will likely have to chart a path between the longtime U.S. commitment to the alliance and Trump’s criticism of other member countries, the Dallas Morning News reported.

The president has frequently charged NATO members with failing to pay their fair share of the organization’s defense costs.

In June, Trump opted not to reaffirm America’s commitment to Article V of the NATO treaty, which assures that all member countries will come to each other’s defense in case of an attack.

But Hutchison’s remarks seemed designed to reassure senators that she believed in NATO’s mission, the Morning News reported.

“I am a strong supporter of this historic defense and security alliance that was formed to protect freedom for all of its members, united and indivisible,” Hutchison said. “I look forward to the Senate confirmation process.”

Trump attends commissioning of USS Ford, makes Obamacare overhaul plea

Jul 22, 2017 4

President Trump presided Saturday in Virginia over the commissioning of the nation’s newest aircraft carrier, the USS Ford, saying, “American hands and American steel constructed a 100,000 ton message to the world. American might is second to none.”

Trump, in his 17-minute speech, avoid political controversies like the Russia meddling-conclusion ordeal that has engulfed his roughly 6-month-old presidency.

However, he used the event to call for an end to sequestration, a congressional agreement on mandatory, across-the-board spending cuts. And he promised Americans tens of billions more in federal spending for the military.

“You will get it,” Trump said. “Believe me. Don’t worry about it.”

Trump also told those in attendance at the Norfolk, Va., naval yard to call their senators to urge them to pass an ObamaCare overhaul bill. Earlier in the morning, he tweeted nearly a dozen times about such familar sore-spots as Russia, Hillary Clinton and “fake news.”

The warship, named after late-President Gerald Ford, joins the Navy fleet behind schedule and at inflated price tag of $12.9 billion. The Navy blames the delays and cost overruns on the ship’s state-of-the-art systems.

Construction on the USS Ford started in 2009 and was to be completed by September 2015 at a cost of $10.5 billion.

Some of the overruns were blamed on the ship’s electromagnetic launch systems for jets and drones that will replace steam catapults.

Trump visited the carrier in March to promote his plans for a military buildup.

He told Time magazine this year that the Navy should revert to using steam catapults to launch fighter jets because some of the state-of-the-art systems and technology aboard the USS Ford “costs hundreds of millions of dollars more money and it’s no good.”

However, on Saturday he praised the ship and its sailors.

“We are so very blessed with Americans who are willing to fight for this great nation,” he said.

The warship also has a smaller “island,” or tower in which commanders work, that sits farther back on the ship to make it easier and quicker to refuel, re-arm and relaunch planes. The vessel also has a nuclear power plant designed to allow cruising speeds of more than 30 knots and operation for 20 years without refueling.

The vessel completed sea trials in April but still will go through a battery of tests and workups at sea before becoming operational and ready for deployment, work that is expected to cost nearly $780 million and take more than four years to complete, congressional auditors said in a report this month.

After military service, Ford was elected to the House of Representatives, serving Michigan until he was tapped by President Richard M. Nixon to become vice president.

Ford became president after Richard Nixon resigned during the Watergate scandal. Ford’s daughter, Susan Ford Bales, who at the ceremony Saturday and christened the vessel in 2013.

Docked at Naval Station Norfolk, the USS Ford eventually will house about 2,600 sailors, 600 fewer than the previous generation of aircraft carriers. The Navy says that will save more than $4 billion over the ship’s 50-year lifespan.

The air wing to support the Ford could add more personnel to the ship, which is designed to house more than 4,600 crew members.

The president’s return visit Saturday was also during the White House’s “Made in America” week, during which Trump and other administration officials highlighted a wide assortment of U.S. products — from trucks and helicopters to baseball bats and glass bottles for pharmaceuticals.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

Trump to attend commissioning of USS Gerald R. Ford, newest aircraft carrier

Jul 22, 2017 12

President Trump will travel to Virginia on Saturday to preside over the commissioning of the nation’s newest aircraft.

“This morning I will be going to the Commissioning Ceremony for the largest aircraft in the world, The Gerald R. Ford. Norfolk, Va.,” Trump tweeted at 7 a.m. ET Saturday.

The USS Ford is named after the country’s 38th president, who rose to the rank of lieutenant commander in the Navy during World War II.

The warship joins the Navy fleet behind schedule and at inflated price tag of $12.9 billion. The Navy blames the delays and cost overruns on the ship’s state-of-the-art systems.

The USS Ford, which is the first member of the next generation of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers, will be welcomed to the fleet with the words: “Man our ship and bring her to life.”

Construction on the USS Ford started in 2009 and was to be completed by September 2015 at a cost of $10.5 billion.

Some of the overruns were blamed on the ship’s electromagnetic launch systems for jets and drones that will replace steam catapults.

Trump, who visited the carrier in March to promote his plans for a military buildup, told Time magazine this year that the Navy should revert to using steam catapults to launch fighter jets because some of the state-of-the-art systems and technology aboard the USS Ford “costs hundreds of millions of dollars more money and it’s no good.”

The warship also has a smaller “island,” or tower in which commanders work, that sits farther back on the ship to make it easier and quicker to refuel, re-arm and relaunch planes. The vessel also has a nuclear power plant designed to allow cruising speeds of more than 30 knots and operation for 20 years without refueling.

The vessel completed sea trials in April but still will go through a battery of tests and workups at sea before becoming operational and ready for deployment, work that is expected to cost nearly $780 million and take more than four years to complete, congressional auditors said in a report this month.

After military service, Ford was elected to the House of Representatives, serving Michigan until he was tapped by President Richard M. Nixon to become vice president.

Ford became president after Richard Nixon resigned during the Watergate scandal. Ford’s daughter, Susan Ford Bales, christened the vessel in 2013.

Docked at Naval Station Norfolk, the USS Ford eventually will house about 2,600 sailors, 600 fewer than the previous generation of aircraft carriers. The Navy says that will save more than $4 billion over the ship’s 50-year lifespan.

The air wing to support the Ford could add more personnel to the ship, which is designed to house more than 4,600 crew members.

The president’s return visit Saturday was falling during what the White House has coined as “Made in America” week, during which Trump and other administration officials highlighted a wide assortment of products — ranging from trucks and helicopters to baseball bats and glass bottles for pharmaceuticals — that are manufactured in the United States.

“This is American craftsmanship at its biggest, at its best, at its finest,” Trump said aboard the carrier earlier this year. “American workers are the greatest anywhere in the world. This warship, and all who serve on it, should be a source of shared pride for our nation.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.