Arkansas prison agency: Complacency led to inmate's escape

Jun 27, 2016 70

One prison staffer has been fired and another was suspended without pay after an investigation showed complacency among Arkansas Department of Correction staff led to the escape of an inmate who was previously convicted of killing a teenage girl and stuffing her body in a barrel.

Arkansas Department of Correction Director Wendy Kelley said Monday that the investigation into 40-year-old Lloyd Jones’ June 13 escape shows several staff mistakes. Jones was on the run for three days.

Kelley says two guards and two construction officers were with a group of 16 inmates. Eventually, one guard ended up watching 13 inmates, and Jones saw an opportunity to escape. Kelley says the guard is facing disciplinary action as well.

Kelley says wardens will be instructed to review work assignments for certain inmates.

Family of dead student who served as drug informant sues for wrongful death

Jun 27, 2016 112
Andrew Sadek in 2013.

Andrew Sadek in 2013. (AP Photo/Tammy Sadek)

The family of a North Dakota college student who was a confidential informant for a drug task force filed a wrongful death lawsuit Monday accusing a sheriff’s department, a deputy and the county of failing to ensure the 20-year-old’s safety.

The body of 20-year-old Andrew Sadek was found about two years ago in the Red River, which separates North Dakota from Minnesota, not far from where he attended college in Wahpeton. An autopsy concluded Sadek died of a gunshot wound to the head but the manner of death was “undetermined,” according to the complaint brought by John and Tammy Sadek.

Their suit names as defendants Richland County Sheriff’s deputy Jason Weber, who was part of the task force, as well as the county. It says the defendants failed to train Andrew Sadek to perform undercover operations and failed to “reasonably supervise” him.

A spokeswoman for the North Dakota attorney general’s office, which is defending the lawsuit, was not immediately available for comment.

The Sadeks are asking for unspecified economic damages, including the cost of the memorial, and non-economic damages related to mental anguish, emotional distress, grief and loss of companionship.

A report by the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation said Sadek got in trouble with the law in April 2013, when he twice sold marijuana to a confidential informant. Both transactions were small — $20 and $60 worth of drugs — but they took place in a school zone, making the potential charges against him serious felonies. Later that year, drug task force agents searched Sadek’s dorm room and said they found a grinder containing marijuana residue. The next day, Sadek completed paperwork to become a confidential informant, making three drug buys for the regional task force over the next three months.

The task force didn’t hear from Sadek after that.

The family does not believe Sadek killed himself. A backpack full of rocks was tied around Sadek’s body and he was wearing different clothes from the time he was last seen, the suit said.

Lawyers for the family sent a letter to federal authorities in April asking the U.S. Department of Justice and FBI to investigate the case. The Justice Department said it was reviewing the case. There was no response from the FBI, the family’s lawyers said.

North Dakota drug informant's family sues for wrongful death

Jun 27, 2016 104

The family of a North Dakota college student who was a confidential informant for a drug task force filed a wrongful death lawsuit Monday accusing a sheriff’s department, a deputy and the county of failing to ensure the 20-year-old’s safety.

The body of 20-year-old Andrew Sadek was found about two years ago in the Red River, which separates North Dakota from Minnesota, not far from where he attended college in Wahpeton. An autopsy concluded Sadek died of a gunshot wound to the head but the manner of death was “undetermined,” according to the complaint brought by John and Tammy Sadek.

Their suit names as defendants Richland County Sheriff’s deputy Jason Weber, who was part of the task force, as well as the county. It says the defendants failed to train Andrew Sadek to perform undercover operations and failed to “reasonably supervise” him.

A spokeswoman for the North Dakota attorney general’s office, which is defending the lawsuit, was not immediately available for comment.

The Sadeks are asking for unspecified economic damages, including the cost of the memorial, and non-economic damages related to mental anguish, emotional distress, grief and loss of companionship.

A report by the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation said Sadek got in trouble with the law in April 2013, when he twice sold marijuana to a confidential informant. Both transactions were small — $20 and $60 worth of drugs — but they took place in a school zone, making the potential charges against him serious felonies. Later that year, drug task force agents searched Sadek’s dorm room and said they found a grinder containing marijuana residue. The next day, Sadek completed paperwork to become a confidential informant, making three drug buys for the regional task force over the next three months.

The task force didn’t hear from Sadek after that.

The family does not believe Sadek killed himself. A backpack full of rocks was tied around Sadek’s body and he was wearing different clothes from the time he was last seen, the suit said.

Lawyers for the family sent a letter to federal authorities in April asking the U.S. Department of Justice and FBI to investigate the case. The Justice Department said it was reviewing the case. There was no response from the FBI, the family’s lawyers said.

A New Paradigm for Building Customer Trust

Jun 27, 2016 175

Once upon a time, handshakes and personal ties built trust between a business and its customers. Technology has upended this: the masses are more trusted than leaders, and the world’s largest companies (think Google, Facebook, Amazon) have essentially zero face-to-face interaction with customers. So how is trust built today? To answer this question, our team studied SiteJabber’s million-member community of customers and the 60,000 businesses the community has reviewed. The following is what we learned.

Privacy first, second and third.

In the post-Snowden world, privacy has become a key branding differentiator for the likes of Apple and Microsoft. Seventy-two percent of Americans are reluctant to share information with businesses because they “ just want to maintain [their] privacy.” But respecting privacy need not be confined to pledges of fighting government information requests, using the latest encryption technology, and promises not to sell user data. Respect for privacy, and the concomitant building of trust with customers, can start with simply not asking customers for any more information than is absolutely necessary. For example, consumers are often told that when dealing with an unfamiliar business, requests for unnecessary information should be seen as a red flag. That is, if you’re buying a pair of sneakers online, there is no reason that a business should be asking for your birth date, social security number, annual income, copies of your ID or credit card, and so on (you’d be surprised by how many online businesses ask for these things). On SiteJabber, one of the most common customer complaints involves businesses that ask for too much personal information too soon. So a great way to build trust is to limit the information you collect from customers in the first place. And even if you pass up near-term marketing opportunities, the trust you build with customers can be worth much more down the road.

Related: Gaining Customers’ Trust Can Be Your Checkmate

Survive brand “Background Checks.”

Brand and trust now matter more than ever. Sixty-two percent of global company value is “intangible”, of which brand and customer goodwill are critical components. Contrast that to 1950, when intangible value was only 30 percent. But how do customers first learn about your brand today? Google. As many as 20 percent of all Google queries are navigational; that is people searching for brands and information about brands. Other common searches from prospective customers include your brand plus the word “reviews” or “complaints.” What appears on those Google search pages defines how prospective customers see your brand, at least initially. This behooves businesses not just to monitor branded search queries, but to actively manage what appears on those pages. This means robustly developing social media properties, cultivating online press, and actively managing customer reviews and complaints. We commonly see SiteJabber community members write posts like, “I was considering such and such company, but I Googled them and they have horrible press/complaints/customer service issues, etc.”

Related: How to Earn and Keep a Customer’s Trust

Customer reviews.

Gone are the days when a handful of customer testimonials and case studies are enough to persuade new customers to buy. An incredible 90 percent of Americans say buying decisions are influenced by reviews. But what is the best way to develop reviews for your brand? Tech savvy customers will trust your brand more if they see legitimate customer reviews from independent third-party review sites. Beyond that, at SiteJabber we have found three key takeaways for businesses seeking to build trust:

  1. More reviews is better — businesses with over 1,000 reviews receive 672 percent more leads and have an 18 percent higher rating.
  2. Customers don’t trust reviews if they don’t see at least some bad ones — businesses with 10 to 30 percent negative reviews actually receive more than 10 times more leads than businesses with nearly all five-star reviews.
  3. Respond professionally to every review — businesses that respond to every review have an 86 percent higher rating than those that don’t.

On-site professionalism.

Professionalism used to mean a pressed suit, a firm handshake, and good manners. Today customer trust hinges more on how you present yourself on your website.

Related: Why Should Your Customers Trust You?

Our community on SiteJabber has indicated the following items can all build trust for a brand:

  • Clear contact information: phone number, email address and physical address. Bonus points for real-time online chat.
  • Clean, modern website design that works well on desktop and mobile and is compatible with all common browser/OS combinations. It should not look like a template or have broken formatting.
  • Links to press mentions, awards, and industry group memberships
  • Links to social media assets and reviews
  • No grammatical or spelling errors
  • No broken links
  • Informative videos (but should only play when clicked on—no autoplay)
  • No sounds or music (in videos is OK)
  • SSL/HTTPs when possible
  • Fast page load times
  • Detailed “about us” area
  • Clear “terms” and “privacy” pages
  • No “pop-up” windows
  • Upfront pricing information
  • Fast turnaround on customer service and sales enquiries (ideally within 1 business day)
  • Upfront terms and conditions on purchases — buried subscription, cancelation, and return policies are a top 10 complaint

Maria Sharapova to Attend Harvard Program Amidst Doping Scandal

Jun 27, 2016 42

While five-time Grand Slam winner Maria Sharapova is appealing a two-year ban from tennis after testing positive for meldonium during the Australian Open in January, she seems to be falling back on one of her other talents: business.

Related: Maria Sharapova and 6 Athletes Who Lost Their Nike Endorsements

The 29-year-old Russian athlete tweeted on Saturday that she would be attending a two-week Harvard business program this summer.

Sharapova has her own candy company, Sugarpova, which sells chocolates and gummy snacks internationally.

Group deploys military veterans to volunteer in Detroit

Jun 27, 2016 106
  • Veterans Thomas Hart, left, and Damika Wallace work on building outdoor furniture at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Veterans Thomas Hart, left, and Damika Wallace work on building outdoor furniture at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It’s the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) (The Associated Press)

  • Veterans and volunteers unload supplies at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Veterans and volunteers unload supplies at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It’s the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) (The Associated Press)

  • Veteran Jordan Daniel, left, and volunteers work on dismantling an old fence, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Daniel is one of hundreds of veterans who are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Veteran Jordan Daniel, left, and volunteers work on dismantling an old fence, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Daniel is one of hundreds of veterans who are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It’s the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) (The Associated Press)

Dozens of military veterans have come to Detroit, where they plan to spend five days helping to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources.

It’s the latest — and largest — effort undertaken by St. Louis, Missouri-based The Mission Continues, a nonprofit that encourages and aids volunteerism by veterans.

Teams of volunteers fanned out Monday to three locations in a neighborhood on the northeast side of Detroit. At one of those, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran Ben Eichel (EYE’-kuhl) and others worked at a park to pick up trash, remove old fencing and build benches.

The 33-year-old from Denver says The Mission Continues allows him and his fellow vets to successfully “reintegrate in civilian society” and appeals to those who “want to do good.”

2 campers presumed dead found alive after West Virginia floods

Jun 27, 2016 48
Garrett Tenney reports from West Virginia

 

Two men who were presumed dead when a camper was swept away in rushing waters during the West Virginia floods were found alive, officials said Monday as more heavy rain fell on already-soaked parts of the state.

The discovery of the men lowers the death toll to 23, officials said. That number includes 20 bodies found and three people who are missing and presumed dead.

The men were either camping or getting ready to set up camp when the rain started last Thursday, said Timothy Rock, spokesman for West Virginia Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

The left all of their gear and their truck at the camp site in the Blue Bend area of the Monongahela National Forest in Greenbrier County, the hardest-hit area, and caught a ride out with another party.

“I think the first responders must have reported them missing and that got into them being just presumed dead. Then they wound up turning up yesterday,” Rock said.

Greenbrier County Sheriff Jan Cahill said the men just left their belongings at the campground and went home. Cahill also said the men were never on his office’s presumed dead list.

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The men were from the Bluefield area — about a two-hour drive from the campsite. Rock and Cahill did not know their names.

The National Weather Service warned downpours Monday could bring a half-inch of rain or more in some areas ravaged by flooding, including Greenbrier, Kanawha and Nicholas counties.

“Everybody’s just keeping an eye on the sky” as search and rescue teams continue to check whether everyone is accounted for, Rock said. If the storms intensify, rescue crews may have to pull back.

Early indications are that hundreds, perhaps thousands of homes have been damaged or destroyed. The only county to give an updated number to state officials was Roane County, which reported 500 properties damaged. Teams from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are taking stock of the disaster and National Guard crews were removing debris.

More than 400 people were staying in 17 shelters across the state, and many people were trying to come to grips with ruined property and where they’ll live next. Others formed armed patrols to protect what was left of their homes and possessions after reports of looting.

Fayette County Sheriff Steve Kessler warned potential looters in a statement posted to Facebook that anyone caught would be arrested and jailed, according to WCHS-TV (http://bit.ly/28Yjjm8).

“If the residents of this area catch you first, you may not make it to jail,” he said.

On Sunday, dozens of residents from flooded-out Rainelle remained at a shelter more than 25 miles away at the Ansted Baptist Church, where singing from inside mixed with the bustle of activity outside.

The church’s gymnasium has been converted to a shelter. The church also is a drop-off point for donated goods as well as a makeshift kennel for dog owners.

For now, it’s home for Jerry Reynolds, his wife, Janice, and his brother, Marcus Reynolds.

Janice Reynolds said she drove back to Rainelle on Saturday to survey the damage. She said her home was destroyed, a vehicle was lost in the floodwaters and the community “smelled like death.”

Bill Kious of Rainelle was asked how those at the shelter, many of them on modest incomes, were able to stay positive.

“Frankly, because we’ve lived a rough lifestyle,” Kious said. “It’s a nature to us that we can’t get rid of.”

Rick Lewis of the Nuttall Fire Department said 129 people were staying Sunday at the church gymnasium. Many more Rainelle residents were sent to other shelters, he said.

Among those taking advantage of the shelter’s kennel was T.J. Parker of Rainelle and his pet Titan.

Parker said he and Titan had to swim four blocks to safety. Along the way, he stopped to rescue an elderly man calling for help and brought him through floodwaters to a fire department. Parker said he had to go under water and hold his breath to support the man and come up for air.

“I realize that sounds crazy, but you have to do what you have to do at that time,” Parker said.

Authorities have yet to start sizing up the flood damage in West Virginia. But it is drawing comparisons to November 1985 floods that remain the state’s most expensive natural disaster with more than $570 million in damage.

The 1985 floods left 47 dead in West Virginia, more than half of them in Pendleton and Grant counties. The Potomac River at Paw Paw crested 29 feet above flood stage. More than 3,500 homes, 180 businesses and 43 bridges statewide were destroyed. Twenty-nine counties were declared federal disaster areas.

Demanding Customers Are the Ones Who Motivate Innovation

Jun 27, 2016 119

Someone recently asked me which customers I enjoy working with the most. As I crafted my response, I chuckled, because my favorite customer is often the most difficult and demanding. They are always asking us to do more, to push our product beyond its capabilities and they keep me thinking about how we can exceed their expectations well beyond the classic work day. I call them our “lightning customers.” They are a partner who is, in many respects, more capable, has higher expectations of your team or your product than you do and isn’t afraid to share their opinions, their pain points and their insights. Lightning customers push us to problem solve, think outside the box and stress test our biggest ideas.

Related: Create a Better Digital Marketing Strategy With These 4 Tips

The mission of my team is to enable millions of people to work the way they choose. We believe that when we use the tools that make our lives easier, work gets better. The energy our most engaged customers put into providing feedback on their experiences helps us to improve the business, and no one does this better than a lightning customer.

But a lightning customer is just that — one that doesn’t strike often, packs a ton of energy, and can burn. But they introduce a huge opportunity if you can harness their energy. So, how can you tell the difference between an individual or company that is just difficult and a true lightning customer? There are three questions I ask when I sense I’m working with one:

1. How wide is the problem?

Is their problem unique to them, or do other customers share it? If you listen to what your customers are asking for, you’ll avoid the common misstep of building a product without a market. The last thing you want to be is the “New Coke.” For example, when users on Twitter started using hashtags to create easily searchable terms, Twitter developers caught on and made them a core feature by hyperlinking those hashtags. Now we couldn’t even imagine Twitter without them. If multiple customers are asking for the same thing, this is definitely an opportunity to innovate.

2. Is it a future problem?

If other customers don’t currently share this problem, will they in the future? It’s important to ask yourself whether it’s possible that this customer is pointing out a problem or need that other customers will eventually have. I experienced this firsthand when my team was responsible for helping one of the largest online streaming companies move all of their company documents to store on Drive — about 35 terabytes of data. Because of the sheer volume, this truly stress tested our system. Rather than complain and wait for us to figure it out, this lightning customer worked with us closely to build new features and maximize the potential of Drive. While they may have been the first company to need so much capacity, it turned out they weren’t alone. As our enterprise business grew and more large companies started working with us, we found the features we built for this one customer were necessary for many of our larger customers with terabytes of data.

Related: Score a Touchdown in Customer Engagement With These 3 Lessons From the NFL

3. Will your customer become a partner?

Is the customer willing to be an active partner in the project? The ultimate defining characteristic of a lightning customer is their willingness to work with you. If the problem they are asking you to solve will require a heavy lift, ask them, “Are you willing to work with us on this?” Tell them exactly what you’re going to need from them, and be honest. To properly execute on a lighting customer project, you may need to assemble a dedicated team and pool resources that were previously allocated elsewhere. If you’re going to invest that much on your end, the customer needs to be willing to meet you halfway. If they need to assign their own team to the project as well, tell them. If executive leadership needs to make final decisions, ask them if the executives are just as invested as the team who is doing the bulk of the work. The last thing you want is for everyone to hustle on a project only to get rejected once it’s brought to the decision-makers.

Related: Here’s why Twitter Is the Best Customer Engagement Platform for Startups

Once you engage and commit to partnering with a lightning customer, it’s important to get everyone who will be working closely with them invested as well. Invite your customer to talk to the team, or better still, visit their offices and see their pain points and needs first hand — don’t just file a bug. Hold a brainstorming session with the customer and ask them to let you know what they need in their own words. Having a direct connection to customers is also extremely energizing and motivating for the folks who will have to make the magic happen by designing, coding or supporting this customer.

California wildfire 'most destructive' in county history

Jun 27, 2016 97
Will Carr reports from California

 

A California wildfire that killed two people and destroyed 200 homes in the southern Sierra Nevada burned away from neighborhoods Monday, clearing the way for some residents to return to homes that survived the savage flames.

The fire grew to more than 70 square miles, but was it 40 percent contained as it burned in steep terrain south of Lake Isabella. Houses could be vulnerable if winds blow the fire back toward some of the communities in the popular recreation area, Fire Chief Brian Marshall said.

“There’s still more threats out there,” Marshall said. “This is going to go down as the most destructive wildfire in Kern County history.”

Cadaver dogs searched through the rubble of devastated neighborhoods for more possible casualties, though remains found over the weekend were identified as an animal, Kern County sheriff’s spokesman Ray Pruitt said.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation. A man with two guns was arrested Sunday in a mandatory evacuation area, though further details weren’t available, Pruitt said.

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The fire began Thursday and quickly exploded in dry brush and bore down on small communities of houses and mobile homes that surround Lake Isabella, a dammed section of the scenic Kern River popular for fishing, whitewater rafting and other outdoor activities.

Terrifying flames arrived with little warning and residents, many elderly, had to flee amid heavy smoke. “People were escaping barely within an inch of their lives,” Marshall said.

The bodies of an elderly couple, apparently overcome by smoke, were found Friday. Their names have not been released.

In addition to the destroyed homes, another 75 were damaged. Evacuations were still in place Monday, but residents who lived in areas with limited fire damage were being allowed to return at noon.

“Most people here, this is all they had,” said Daniel O’Brien, 53, who lost two rental mobile homes. “You have these moments where you just want to break down crying and fall apart.”

The fire was the most damaging blaze in California, but it is just one of many that have burned large swaths of the arid West during hot weather.

Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency to free up funds for firefighting and eventual cleanup. The Federal Emergency Management Agency also authorized funds for firefighting efforts.

LGBT Crowd Eyes Preschool Children

Jun 27, 2016 342
Ordinance has wide-ranging implications about sex, safety and spirituality; Shannon Bream reports on 'Special Report'

 

When enrolling your children in preschool, a curriculum check will now be mandatory.

“There was once a time when it was unthinkable to even mention the topic of homosexuality in a school setting,” said one pro-family activist.

A new web series called “Queer Kids Stuff” aimed at preschoolers (yes, you read that right) is now attempting to teach those barely out of diapers what the phrases “gay,” “bisexual,” and “transgender” mean.

In the opening minutes of the first show, the host tells a teddy bear, as well as innocent viewers, that “gay means love.”

Although no U.S. preschool programs have indicated yet that they will embrace the series, it may only be a matter of time.

“It is easily conceivable that videos such as these will be sanctioned eventually by local school boards and implemented in preschool and prekindergarten classes,” said Sean Ryan, communications director of the pro-family organization Mass Resistance, based in Waltham, Massachusetts.

“Activists are trying to force these topics on younger and younger children because that is the only way their movement wins,” he said.

“Rational adults don’t buy into the so-called ‘Queer Theory’ or transgenderism. Unfortunately, children are a soft target for homosexual activists as they are malleable and still learning about the world.”

JamesMichael Nichols, deputy editor of the Queer Voices section of The Huffington Post, claims the web series explains the “issues and language” of the LGBT community in a way “that is accessible for preschool-aged children.”

The show is “intended to be a conversation starter between adults and kids about queer issues,” Nichols wrote. “While the episodes may focus on explaining a basic queer idea — like what does ‘gay’ mean — it also answers questions for children that some adults may not have the ability or language to talk about.”

But he’s missing the point, and perhaps deliberately so. Parents may not have the language to explain LGBT issues because they don’t want it — they have control, after all, over what gets discussed in the home. Ironically, preschoolers don’t “have the language” to even share with their parents all that they learn in preschool.

Parents must be the protective figures who make sure what is presented to innocent, growing minds is what they decide is fit.

“Personally I am opposed to something like this,” said one Massachusetts parent.

“These are the years of the W’s: who, what, when, and why,” series creator Amer told The Huffington Post. “These ages are when children are learning and soaking up everything they can about the world they were pretty recently introduced to. While they are learning about the world, they are also beginning to form their own opinions about the things in this world.”

Amer also said, “If they aren’t seeing queerness in their world (particularly in their media), how can they know to ask questions and spark conversations (as many parents won’t do this themselves)? And what happens if the first time they are introduced to a queer topic, it has a negative connotation? As soon as that happens, it is far more difficult to undo that moment than it is to simply introduce the topic truthfully and positively first.”

Nichols is ecstatic about this new vehicle toting the LGBT agenda. “We’re super excited about this project and can’t wait to see what’s ahead,” he wrote. “Check out the first episode, “What Does Gay Mean?…”

“It’s no surprise the LGBT movement is attempting to impose its propaganda to school children at younger and younger ages,” Ryan of Mass Resistance told LifeZette. “There was once a time when it was unthinkable to even mention the topic of homosexuality in a school setting. Now, there are homosexual, bisexual [and] transgender lesson plans for kids as young as kindergarten.”

“I don’t think children of that age totally understand gender,” Brandon Chapman of Reading, Massachusetts, told LifeZette. “Personally I would be opposed to something like this. Teaching general acceptance of people is great, but I think specifically talking about same-sex couples would be too confusing.”

Ryan said today’s parents naturally support the indoctrination of the young — they themselves were indoctrinated, even if they don’t realize it.

“Kids don’t naturally buy into this stuff. They have to be brainwashed,” he asserted. “We’ve seen this with the acceptance of homosexuality and homosexual marriage. Homosexuality is supported by a majority of adults aged 18-29, not because young adults just naturally support it — but because they are the group that first began to be bombarded by this propaganda in the early 1990s.”