Indiana Homegrown Food will be Featured in State Fair Theme

Apr 12, 2017 51

Wonderful World of Food

Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb announced via social channels Wednesday the theme for the 2017 Indiana State Fair. Again there will be a focus on farmers, and this year the attention is paid to what they’re helping put on your plates.

“Janet and I have enjoyed our frequent visits to the Indiana State Fair over the years and are truly looking forward to our first official fair as Governor and first lady,” he said in the YouTube video. “Today I’m lucky enough the one that tells you that this year’s theme for the great Indiana State Fair is the Wonderful World of Food.”

There will be as much variety built in to the theme as there is variety in Hoosier farm products.

“Here in Indiana we grow it, we sell it, we eat it, and at the 2017 Indiana State Fair we’re going to celebrate it. There’s popcorn, apples, corn dogs and even turkey legs. Each one of them has a homegrown Hoosier connection and a story to tell.”

Stories will also be told about the Indiana mint industry, eggs, honey, tomato farmers who help produce your salsa and ketchup, ice cream, and of course the products from soybean, wheat, beef and hog farmers. Each of the 17 days of the fair, August 4-20, will feature an Indiana food product and a farmer who produces it. It begins on August 4th with soybean farmers in the spotlight on Deep Fried Food Day. Later in the fair a tree farmer will be featured during food On-A-Stick Day.

There will be food samples to enjoy, cooking demonstrations, food eating contests, and recipe sharing.

“Hoosiers have deep connections to food, and there is no better place to showcase how much fun we can have with food than the Great Indiana State Fair” said Cindy Hoye, Executive Director, Indiana State Fairgrounds & Event Center. “We want to shine the spotlight on all our state has to offer, and we look forward to the celebration of our ‘Wonderful World of Food’ at this year’s Fair.”

Fair organizers also hope attendees will help in sharing the story of how Indiana is feeding the world. Additionally, Fairgoers will get to enjoy many of the featured foods, along with their traditional Fair food favorites, at more than 90 food stands throughout the Fairgrounds.

Here is the featured foods schedule:

Aug. 4 – Deep Fried Food (Soybean Farmer)

Aug. 5 – Melon (Melon Farmer)

Aug. 6 – Popcorn (Popcorn Farmer)

Aug. 7 – Salsa/Ketchup (Tomato Farmer)

Aug. 8 – Egg (Egg Farmer)

Aug. 9 – Pork Burger (Pig Farmer)

Aug. 10 – Funnel Cake (Wheat Farmer)

Aug. 11 – Cheese (Dairy Farmer)

Aug. 12 – Beef (Beef Farmer)

Aug. 13 – Ice Cream (Dairy Farmer)

Aug. 14 – Apples (Apple Farmer)

Aug. 15 – Mint (Mint Farmer)

Aug. 16 – Corn Dog (Corn Farmer)

Aug. 17 – On-A-Stick Day (Tree Farmer)

Aug. 18 – Turkey Leg (Turkey Farmer)

Aug. 19 – Pickles (Cucumber Farmer)

Aug. 20 – Honey (Beekeeper)

An Unintended Consequence of the VFD

Apr 12, 2017 53

Bees and VFD

If you raise cattle or pigs or poultry, any of the major livestock species, you are familiar with the veterinary feed directive. But there is at least one minor species that the directive caught by surprise.

Before January 1 beekeepers could get medications over the counter, but then VFD went into effect and beekeepers now have to go through a veterinarian. Mark Dykes, President of the Apiary Inspectors of America calls it an unintended consequence of the regulation.

“For the larger commercial operations, they are adapting to this, they understand that they have to get these veterinarian relationships going to get the prescriptions written for hives that are in need of antibiotics. But for the smaller commercial operations and backyard beekeepers it is news to them. Their vet that takes care of their dog is not the one that will take care of their bees, so we are having to educate them to alternatives to the antibiotic treatment.”

For an industry already facing challenges, Dykes says the concern is instead of working with a veterinarian, smaller beekeepers will simply not take care of their hives like they should.

“That’s always a fear. Antibiotics have done a good job, along with inspections, along with beekeepers understanding American Foul Brood, keeping levels very low. So we are concerned now that antibiotics are harder to get, that we might see an increase in the amount of American Foul Brood, especially in smaller operations.”

American foul brood is a spore forming bacteria that once in a hive is very difficult to get out.

Beekeepers with questions about the veterinary feed directive should contact their state inspector or extension educators.

Reebok to Manufacture Shoes Made from Corn

Apr 12, 2017 54
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Reebok will begin making shoes from corn and organic cotton later this year. The initiative is an effort to create more sustainable products. A Reebok spokesperson states, “Reebok is trying to clean up the entire life cycle of shoe making.” Reebok says the sole of the new shoe will be made with petroleum-free, non-toxic, industrial-grown corn, while the body of the shoe will be made with 100 percent organic cotton. The line is part of the company’s Corn + Cotton initiative. Both the cotton and corn in Reebok’s new shoes are compostable; and, by composting the shoes after use, the compost can become part of the soil to grow new materials for the next “range of shoes.” Currently, most shoes are made with oil-based plastics.

Both Nike and Adidas have similar initiatives to create sustainable and recyclable shoes.
Source: NAFB News Service

Ethanol Production Hits 18 Week Low

Apr 12, 2017 47

According to EIA data as analyzed by the Renewable Fuels Association, U.S. ethanol production averaged 1.019 million barrels per day which is 42.8 million gallons daily. That is down 35,000 b/d from the week before and stands as the lowest weekly production volume in 18 weeks. The four-week average for ethanol production dipped slightly to 1.04 million b/d for an annualized rate of 15.94 billion gallons.

Stocks of ethanol increased 1.7% from last week to a new record high of 23.7 million barrels—7% higher than year-ago levels. Average weekly gasoline demand declined 2.9% to 388.3 million gallons (9.245 million barrels) daily. Year-to-date gasoline demand is 3.0% below year-ago levels. Refiner/blender input of ethanol averaged 918,000 b/d, the highest rate of the year so far.

U.S. Tractor Sales Up in March

Apr 12, 2017 42
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U.S. tractor sales in March increased six percent compared to a year ago. The Association of Equipment Manufacturers released its monthly sales report this week. The report shows that for the first three months in 2017, a total of 42,033 tractors were sold which compares to 39,878 sold through March 2016, representing a five percent increase for the year. For the month, two-wheel drive smaller tractors, rated 40 horsepower and under, were up ten percent from last year.

Meanwhile, sales of 40 to 100 horsepower tractors were up two percent; 100-plus horsepower two-wheel drive tractor sales were down 15 percent; but four-wheel drive tractors in the same category increased 21 percent. Combine sales were up 11 percent for the month, and sales of combines for the year so far totaled 715, a 16 percent decrease from levels last year.

Source: NAFB News Service

Pence, Ross, to Talk Trade with Japan

Apr 11, 2017 48
Mike Pence

Vice President Mike Pence and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross will travel to Japan to discuss trade later this month. The duo is scheduled to travel to Tokyo on April 18. The U.S. officials will meet with Japan’s finance, foreign, and industry Ministers. Japan is the top export market for the U.S. pork industry, and the National Pork Producers Council has urged the Donald Trump administration to begin negotiations on a free trade agreement with Japan.

Republican Representatives Adrian Smith of Nebraska and Ted Yoho of Florida also recently introduced a House Resolution asking the administration to start the process of establishing a free trade agreement with Japan. Congressman Smith said the U.S. “cannot afford” to miss the opportunity to reduce trade barriers with Japan, “especially for U.S. agriculture producers.”

Source: NAFB News Service

Hoosier Homestead Awards Honor Commitment to the Land

Apr 11, 2017 61

Last week Indiana Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch and State Department of Agriculture (ISDA) Director Ted McKinney presented Hoosier Homestead Awards to 39 farming families. The award recognizes the commitment by those families to Indiana agriculture, and the commitment of one family dates back to before Indiana was a state. Gary Jacobi and family from Greenville in Floyd County received this round’s only Bicentennial award.

Gary Jacobi

“In 1816 we have a deed signed by James Madison, 4th President of the United States, that we had obtained 160 acres at that time a few months before Indiana became a state in November of that year,” he told HAT. “So, it’s be in the family and passed down from Collins, to Taylor, to now Jacobi, passing down on the female side. The farm is my mom’s home place.”

She lives in the 2-story red brick house built in the mid 1820’s. The 400-acre farm includes 100 acres of timber and 240 acres of crop land.

McKinney with ISDA says the biannual presentations the past 40 years offer a tip of the hat to families and their commitment to the land.

Ted McKinney

“When you can marry those together, families coming together, families passing along an asset like farmland and then celebrate that with those accomplishments of 100, or 150 or 200 years in the family, it just makes for a great celebration,” McKinney said. “It comes back to that reverence of the land, reverence of farms and reverence of being Hoosier farmers.”

The Hoosier Homestead program is administered by ISDA and has recognized more than 5,000 farms since 1976. To be named a Hoosier Homestead, farms must be owned by the same family for more than 100 consecutive years; and consist of more than 20 acres or produce more than $1000 of agricultural products per year.

“Agriculture contributes $31 billion to our state’s economy, and it’s because of the hard work, dedication and innovation of Indiana’s farming families,” said Lt. Governor Crouch. “I want to congratulate them on earning the Hoosier Homestead Award and for their commitment to continuing Indiana’s legacy as an agricultural leader.”

Farms received the Centennial Award for 100 years of ownership, the Sesquicentennial Award for 150 years of ownership and in the case of the Jacobi family, the Bicentennial Award for 200 years of ownership.

“Generation after generation of Indiana’s farming families have dedicated their lives to feeding their neighbors, the state and the world,” Director McKinney said. “They have contributed so much to our state’s legacy, both economically and socially, and are the engine that drives our industry forward. It was an honor to recognize all of these great families at the Statehouse.”

Below is a list of the Hoosier Homestead Award recipients honored during the spring 2017 ceremony with their farm county, family name(s), homestead date and type of award”

Adams, Daniel Roth, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Bartholomew, Glenn & Nellie Glick, 1846, Sesquicentennial

Bartholomew, Original Speaker Lane Farm, 1908, Centennial

Clark, Clifton Eve/Elizabeth Weidner Family Farm, 1915, Centennial

Clark, Dreyer, 1865, Sesquicentennial

Decatur, Deniston, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Decatur, Evans, 1834, Sesquicentennial

Dubois, Balsmeyer Family Farm, 1853, Centennial

Dubois, Balsmeyer Family Farm, 1853, Sesquicentennial

Dubois, Egler, 1841, Centennial

Dubois, Egler, 1841, Sesquicentennial

Dubois, Leo C. Welp, 1916, Centennial

Floyd, Sperzel, 1915, Centennial

Floyd, Collins –  Taylor – Jacobi, 1816, Bicentennial

Fountain, Alford, 1907, Centennial

Franklin, Beneker, 1887, Centennial

Harrison, Hausz, 1903, Centennial

Henry, Lacy Homestead Farm, 1864, Sesquicentennial

Howard, Fleming, 1857, Sesquicentennial

Jackson, Wischmeier/Wehmiller, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Jay, Bricher, 1863, Centennial

Jay, Bricher, 1863, Sesquicentennial

Jay, Journay Homestead, Wanda Lou & Merle Stewart, 1887, Centennial

Jay, Charles Muhlenkamp, 1915, Centennial

Jay, Young, 1863, Sesquicentennial

Jefferson, Owens, 1916, Centennial

Knox, Otten, 1859, Sesquicentennial

Marshall, Mishler, 1860, Sesquicentennial

Monroe, Pafford, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Noble, The Coats Family Farm, 1849, Sesquicentennial

Perry, Casey,1867, Sesquicentennial

Putnam, Hurst, 1886, Centennial

Ripley, Jesse Donald Meinders, 1878, Centennial

Ripley, Schneider, 1898, Centennial

Rush, Cole, 1882, Centennial

Rush, Cole, 1895, Centennial

Spencer, Kirby Baum, 1860, Centennial

Spencer, Kirby Baum, 1860, Sesquicentennial

Spencer, Schaaf/Hay, 1892, Centennial

Starke, Luedtke Dairy Farm, 1896, Centennial

Tipton, Gall, 1916, Centennial

Tipton, Kirkendall Family Farm, 1894, Centennial

Wabash, Orville & Phyllis Brodt, 1879, Centennial

White, Godlove, 1863, Sesquicentennial

Hoosier Homestead Awards Honor Commitment to the Land

Apr 11, 2017 58

Last week Indiana Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch and State Department of Agriculture (ISDA) Director Ted McKinney presented Hoosier Homestead Awards to 39 farming families. The award recognizes the commitment by those families to Indiana agriculture, and the commitment of one family dates back to before Indiana was a state. Gary Jacobi and family from Greenville in Floyd County received this round’s only Bicentennial award.

Gary Jacobi

“In 1816 we have a deed signed by James Madison, 4th President of the United States, that we had obtained 160 acres at that time a few months before Indiana became a state in November of that year,” he told HAT. “So, it’s be in the family and passed down from Collins, to Taylor, to now Jacobi, passing down on the female side. The farm is my mom’s home place.”

She lives in the 2-story red brick house built in the mid 1820’s. The 400-acre farm includes 100 acres of timber and 240 acres of crop land.

McKinney with ISDA says the biannual presentations the past 40 years offer a tip of the hat to families and their commitment to the land.

Ted McKinney

“When you can marry those together, families coming together, families passing along an asset like farmland and then celebrate that with those accomplishments of 100, or 150 or 200 years in the family, it just makes for a great celebration,” McKinney said. “It comes back to that reverence of the land, reverence of farms and reverence of being Hoosier farmers.”

The Hoosier Homestead program is administered by ISDA and has recognized more than 5,000 farms since 1976. To be named a Hoosier Homestead, farms must be owned by the same family for more than 100 consecutive years; and consist of more than 20 acres or produce more than $1000 of agricultural products per year.

“Agriculture contributes $31 billion to our state’s economy, and it’s because of the hard work, dedication and innovation of Indiana’s farming families,” said Lt. Governor Crouch. “I want to congratulate them on earning the Hoosier Homestead Award and for their commitment to continuing Indiana’s legacy as an agricultural leader.”

Farms received the Centennial Award for 100 years of ownership, the Sesquicentennial Award for 150 years of ownership and in the case of the Jacobi family, the Bicentennial Award for 200 years of ownership.

“Generation after generation of Indiana’s farming families have dedicated their lives to feeding their neighbors, the state and the world,” Director McKinney said. “They have contributed so much to our state’s legacy, both economically and socially, and are the engine that drives our industry forward. It was an honor to recognize all of these great families at the Statehouse.”

Below is a list of the Hoosier Homestead Award recipients honored during the spring 2017 ceremony with their farm county, family name(s), homestead date and type of award”

Adams, Daniel Roth, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Bartholomew, Glenn & Nellie Glick, 1846, Sesquicentennial

Bartholomew, Original Speaker Lane Farm, 1908, Centennial

Clark, Clifton Eve/Elizabeth Weidner Family Farm, 1915, Centennial

Clark, Dreyer, 1865, Sesquicentennial

Decatur, Deniston, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Decatur, Evans, 1834, Sesquicentennial

Dubois, Balsmeyer Family Farm, 1853, Centennial

Dubois, Balsmeyer Family Farm, 1853, Sesquicentennial

Dubois, Egler, 1841, Centennial

Dubois, Egler, 1841, Sesquicentennial

Dubois, Leo C. Welp, 1916, Centennial

Floyd, Sperzel, 1915, Centennial

Floyd, Collins –  Taylor – Jacobi, 1816, Bicentennial

Fountain, Alford, 1907, Centennial

Franklin, Beneker, 1887, Centennial

Harrison, Hausz, 1903, Centennial

Henry, Lacy Homestead Farm, 1864, Sesquicentennial

Howard, Fleming, 1857, Sesquicentennial

Jackson, Wischmeier/Wehmiller, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Jay, Bricher, 1863, Centennial

Jay, Bricher, 1863, Sesquicentennial

Jay, Journay Homestead, Wanda Lou & Merle Stewart, 1887, Centennial

Jay, Charles Muhlenkamp, 1915, Centennial

Jay, Young, 1863, Sesquicentennial

Jefferson, Owens, 1916, Centennial

Knox, Otten, 1859, Sesquicentennial

Marshall, Mishler, 1860, Sesquicentennial

Monroe, Pafford, 1866, Sesquicentennial

Noble, The Coats Family Farm, 1849, Sesquicentennial

Perry, Casey,1867, Sesquicentennial

Putnam, Hurst, 1886, Centennial

Ripley, Jesse Donald Meinders, 1878, Centennial

Ripley, Schneider, 1898, Centennial

Rush, Cole, 1882, Centennial

Rush, Cole, 1895, Centennial

Spencer, Kirby Baum, 1860, Centennial

Spencer, Kirby Baum, 1860, Sesquicentennial

Spencer, Schaaf/Hay, 1892, Centennial

Starke, Luedtke Dairy Farm, 1896, Centennial

Tipton, Gall, 1916, Centennial

Tipton, Kirkendall Family Farm, 1894, Centennial

Wabash, Orville & Phyllis Brodt, 1879, Centennial

White, Godlove, 1863, Sesquicentennial

Do you Know if Nematodes are Hurting Your Yields?

Apr 11, 2017 48
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Do you Know if Nematodes are Hurting Your Yields?

It is estimated that up to 15% of world agricultural production is lost each year to nematode infestation. Yet, the majority of U.S. corn and soybean growers do not sample for the presence of this microscopic pest and may not know if their crops are being damaged by it. Part of the problem is that you cannot see nematodes with the naked eye so often the damage they cause is attributed to something else. Jerod Thomas, with Seed Applied Solutions, says, “Many times, the damage can look like drought stress or just poor fertilization in a field.”

Thomas told HAT research indicates most growers do not know they have an infestation, “Research we have done indicates that only about 8% of corn farmers and 25% of soybean farmers believe that nematodes are causing damage, but field tests indicate that about 80% of acres have nematode infestation.”  He added that this shows that growers are definitely underestimating the problem.

Help is on the way, according to Thomas. Beginning in 2018 new technology will be available to help control nematodes. “Pending regulatory approval Monsanto will launch a new nematicide called NemaStrike TM,” Thomas said. “It is for  broad-spectrum control of nematodes.” In the meantime, Thomas recommends sampling your fields for the presence of nematodes.