BOAH Dairy Division Announces New Leadership

Sep 19, 2017 15

BOAH-Dairy-Division-promotions

The Indiana State Board of Animal Health will have new leadership at the Dairy Division effective October first. Patrick Hash (right) moves from deputy director up to the director position, and Nathan Campbell (left) will be the new deputy director.

“They both have a good history with our division,” Denise Derrer, BOAH public information officer said, “and also on the industry side of things as well as other states. So, they’ve got some good background and a lot of ideas and new innovation they can bring here as well.”

Hash and Campbell move up with the retirement of Doug Metcalf at the end of this month after five years as Dairy Division Director and12 years as the agency’s Chief of Staff.

The Dairy Division of BOAH does work everyone in Indiana cares about, inspections of dairy farms and dairy processing facilities and milk haulers.

“So, these are important jobs,” Derrer told HAT. “Our number one goal in the Dairy Division is to emphasize food safety and protecting public health, so it’s a big job and there’s a lot to do. We produce 3.8 billion pounds of milk in Indiana every year, so this is no small task.”

The task gets more demanding as the dairy industry continues to grow in Indiana.

“We have been seeing a lot of growth particularly on the processing side, and while our number of farms continues to decline, the output and production of the farms we do have here in Indiana is continuing to grow and we’re getting a lot of expansion on the farms as well. So, that is a definite trend that we’re seeing, and with the soon to be open milk processing facility in the Fort Wayne area for Walmart, we’re only going to see more growth in that area as well.”

Hash first joined the Dairy Division in 2012 then left in 2014 to work for the Michigan Department of Agriculture as the Pasteurization Specialist. Campbell first joined the Dairy Division in 2008, he left in 2011 to work for Dean Foods as a Quality Assurance Manager. Campbell returned to BOAH in 2012 and currently serves as the Chief Milk Rating Officer.

“Leadership is important to the continued success of Indiana’s dairy inspection program,” said Indiana State Veterinarian Dr. Bret D. Marsh. “Having Patrick Hash and Nathan Campbell as part of the Dairy Division’s leadership team will prove a valuable asset to the dairy division and the industry, especially with the recent growth we have seen in Indiana.”

Indiana’s Dairy Division has been part of the Indiana State Board of Animal Health since 1995.

Early Soybeans Looking Good, Yielding Well

Sep 19, 2017 20

Early Soybeans Looking Good, Yielding Well

Mary Gumz

A weekend of warm weather sent more combines to the field. Mary Gumz, agronomist with Dupont Pioneer in NW Indiana, says most of the harvest activity has been in soybean fields, “Definitely seeing combines in the field, mostly cutting early soybeans.  With the warm weather over the weekend and warmer conditions this week, we are going to start seeing more activity in corn fields.”

Gumz told HAT the full season beans are still very green, but the early season varieties are drying down nicely, “I am very pleased the way the soybeans are drying down.” She said she was concerned that there would be a lot of green soybeans because of the lateness in planting and the good growing conditions this summer.  She said the very dry conditions that have existed in NW Indiana during August, while not good for pod fill, have allowed dry down to get underway.

As for yields, Gumz says the growers she has talked with have been reporting good yields, “With the shorter season varieties, around the 2.4 to 2.5 maturity range we are seeing 60 bpa yields.” She added that she expects better yield numbers with the fuller season crops.

Listen to the complete harvest update form DuPont Pioneer on the agronomy page at our web site.

Dry Weather Speeding Indiana Crop Dry Down

Sep 19, 2017 19

Warmer temperatures and little rain helped with dry down for corn and soybeans, according to Greg Matli, Indiana State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Much of Western Indiana was categorized as abnormally dry by the U.S. Drought Monitor. Some areas of the State did receive some residual rainfall from Hurricane Irma, but it was not substantial. The statewide average temperature was 66.6 degrees, 0.1 degrees below normal. Statewide precipitation was 0.27 inches, below average by 0.52 inches. There were 5.9 days available for fieldwork for the week ending September 17, down 0.1 days from the previous week.

Regionally, corn was 88% dented in the North, 83% in Central, and 88% in the South. Corn was 27% matured in the North, 45% in Central, and 54% in the South. Corn was 3% harvested for grain in the North, 3% in Central, and 17% in the South. Corn rated in good to excellent condition was 54% in the North, 49% in Central, and 53% in the South. Soybeans were 41% dropping leaves in the North, 45% in Central, and 43% in the South. Soybeans rated in good to excellent condition were 58% in the North, 50% in Central, and 52% in the South. Winter wheat was 5% planted in the North, 2% in Central, and 1% in the South.

The near-average temperatures coupled with minimal rainfall helped boost crop maturity and dry down. Farmers have begun to harvest corn for grain, although some are concerned that the crop moisture is too high. Corn moisture at harvest was 27%, compared to last year’s 22%. Late planted soybeans could use some more rain to increase pod fill. Some farmers noted high levels of variability in maturity for both corn and soybean fields from late season replantings. Mint and watermelon harvest have begun to wrap up for most growers, but tomato, seed corn, and pumpkin harvest are going strong.

Although the temperatures were up from last week, livestock was reported to be in excellent condition. Hay and pasture growth have continued to slow down and are brown in some areas from the lack of moisture. Other activities included cleaning bins for the upcoming crop, hauling grain, preparing harvest equipment, and mowing roadsides.

Source: NASS

Hoosier Ag Today Begins 12th Year of Serving Indiana Farmers

Sep 19, 2017 22

On September 18, 2006, a group of 10 radio stations around Indiana added a new set of farm programs to their lineup. Known as Hoosier Ag Today, the programs had a new approach with a familiar voice. Gary Truitt had been broadcasting to Indiana farmers since 1985; and, in 2006, he founded Hoosier Ag Today a radio network dedicated to covering Indiana agriculture. “There was a lot going on in Indiana agriculture in 2006, yet it was not being covered by the regional networks then serving the state,” said Truitt.

With the support of Indiana Farm Bureau, the Indiana Soybean Alliance, and Milk Promotion Services of Indiana, Truitt was able to launch the statewide radio network. Within a few short months the number of stations airing HAT programs had grown to 20. Growth in affiliates and coverage would continue, and today 65 stations broadcast Hoosier Ag Today programs every day.

Technology has always been at the heart of the operation. In 2006 most radio networks used satellite technology to deliver their programs to stations. HAT began by offering stations high quality digital audio programs delivered over the internet. Today, HAT uses the internet to deliver content to farmers via a multi-media web site, mobile app, daily podcast, and social media platforms, as well as radio broadcasts. “We are content driven,” said Truitt. “We focus on delivering timely and relevant information to growers in whatever format they want to receive it, on their truck radio, mobile phone, or office computer.”

At the end of 2007, Truitt was joined by veteran broadcaster Andy Eubank and, in 2011, by Jon Truitt as digital services manager. Rounding out the HAT team are Beth Carper, Traffic Manager, and Kathleen Truitt, Chief Financial Officer. The network is represented by J.L. Farmakis for commercial sales. “We are proud to have served Indiana farm families for 11 years and are excited about the future of our organization and Indiana agriculture,” stated Kathleen Truitt.

Donnelly Wants Action on Brazil Ethanol Tariff

Sep 19, 2017 18
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A group of Midwestern Senators is urging U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer to respond to Brazil’s 20 percent ethanol tariff on imports over 600 million liters, or 158 million gallons. Brazil recently reinstated the tariff that will apply to U.S. ethanol exports to Brazil. In 2016, the U.S. exported 264 million gallons of ethanol to Brazil and is poised for an increase this year as the U.S. is the primary ethanol exporter to Brazil. U.S. ethanol producers called Brazil’s tariff plan “a trade barrier that threatens over $750 million in U.S. exports and American jobs.” Led by Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley, a letter asked Lighthizer to “directly engage the Brazilian government and quickly work to resolve” the issue.

The letter included Iowa Senator Joni Ernst, Nebraska Senators Deb Fischer and Ben Sasse, Illinois Senators Tammy Duckworth and Dick Durbin, Minnesota Senators Al Franken and Amy Klobuchar, along with Michigan Senator Debbie Stabenow and Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly.

Source: NAFB News Service

Corn Progress Lagging Average, Condition Trailing 2016

Sep 19, 2017 12
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A fewer number of corn acres have reached the dented or mature stage than the five-year average according to a report released today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. With 86 percent of total corn acres dented by September 17 and mature acres at only 34 percent, corn progress trails the five-year average by four and 13 percentage points respectively.

The number of corn acres harvested also has fallen behind the five- year average given maturity delays, currently trailing by four percentage points. Additionally, 61 percent of all corn acres in the top 18 corn-planted states in 2017 remained in good or excellent condition, 13 percentage points lower than last year at this time.

To view the full report released today, click here.

Source: NCGA

DuPont Pioneer Harvest Update 9/18/17

Sep 18, 2017 21
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DuPont Pioneer Harvest Update 9/18/17A weekend of warm weather sent more combines to the field. Mary Gumz, agronomist with Dupont Pioneer in NW Indiana, says most of the harvest activity has been in soybean fields, “Definitely seeing combines in the field, mostly cutting early soybeans.  With the warm weather over the weekend and warmer conditions this week, we are going to start seeing more activity in corn fields.”

Gumz told HAT the full season beans are still very green, but the early season varieties are drying down nicely, “I am very pleased the way the soybeans are drying down.” She said she was concerned that there would be a lot of green soybeans because of the lateness in planting and the good growing conditions this summer.  She said the very dry conditions that have existed in NW Indiana during August, while not good for pod fill, have allowed dry down to get underway.

As for yields, Gumz says the growers she has talked with have been reporting good yields, “With the shorter season varieties, around the 2.4 to 2.5 maturity range we are seeing 60 bpa yields.” She added that she expects better yield numbers with the fuller season crops.

Listen to the complete harvest update form DuPont Pioneer on the agronomy page at our web site.

Farm Safety Week begins with Focus on Sharing the Roads

Sep 17, 2017 31

Field-on-farm-safety

This is National Farm Safety & Health Week and the third week in September has been recognized as such since 1944 to make sure there is an emphasis on safety as harvest ramps up in rural America. The theme this year is Putting Farm Safety into Practice, and as Bill Field from Purdue explains, both farmers and rural motorists need to participate.

“Everybody has a right to the road, especially those that live in rural communities, because that’s why those roads were built,” he told HAT. “They were designed for bringing things from farm to market and were used to be called farm to market roads. Now they’ve become much more traveled because people are moving out into the countryside. We’re seeing a lot more settlements and development of historical farm land, and so there’s a lot more crowded conditions on these roads especially during fall harvest, and everybody needs to remember that these roads are for people to get their jobs done as well as for folks to get back and forth every day to their jobs in town. So there’s got to be an understanding that we have to share these roads together.”

What’s the major cause of accidents on roads during harvest? Field says it is high speeds.

“A good example of that is what we’re seeing in the Amish community,” he said. “We saw probably the highest number of buggy related incidents that I’ve ever seen this past year, 2016. That really is a mix between very slow moving vehicles that are being pulled by horses and people who just really want to push the limits for traveling on these country roads, and that mix isn’t very good.”

Field says over the next couple of months, farmers and motorists need to do all they can to accommodate each other’s needs. The more we do, the safer harvest will be.

Field is Professor in Agricultural and Biological Engineering at Purdue University.

Data from the Department of Labor shows the agricultural sector is still the most dangerous in America with 570 fatalities, which equals 22.8 deaths per 100,000 workers. When combining all labor sectors the death rate was 3.4%.

Bower Trading Market Strategy Report: Chinese Ethanol Will Boost Corn Prices

Sep 17, 2017 109

Bower Trading Market Strategy Report: Chinese Ethanol Will Boost Corn Prices

Doug Werling

More bearish production news from the USDA last week, but some bullish news from China. China announced it has set a goal of blending 10% of its gasoline with ethanol by the year 2020. Doug Werling, with Bower Trading, says that is good news for the U.S. corn grower, “Currently, they can produce 700 million gallons annually. They will have 10 new ethanol plants come on line in the next year that will produce an additional billion gallons. Out of the 54 billion gallons of gasoline they consume each year by 2020, they will need to produce 5.4 billion gallons of ethanol.”

This this demand is going to take some time to show up in the market over the next few years. Werling says it will become a major factor, “This will account for about 50 MMT of corn. Currently the U.S. is projected to have a carryover of 200 MMT of corn. So you are talking about 25% of our carryover just to produce the increased ethanol demand from China.” He added this could increase demand for corn by 2.2 billion bushels of corn.

On the soybean side, we did see more purchases of soybeans by China last week, as the dollar remains weak. Also, early soybean yield numbers are running about10 bpa below average, and that adds more skepticism to the USDA yield estimates. “We had some 70 bpa reports from Indiana, 60 bpa from Illinois, and 70 bpa from Iowa. These are early soybeans so they should be the highest yields we see,” said Werling.

For more market strategy information, contact Bower Trading at 800-533-8045 or bowertrading.com.

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Synergy Feeds, Expands to Serve Allen County and Surrounding Area

Sep 17, 2017 91

Synergy Feeds, LLC the established local feed mill serving customers in northeastern Indiana and regions of Michigan, will expand operations with a new state-ofthe-art feed mill in Edgerton, Indiana.

Synergy Feeds management has been evaluating the benefits of adding another feed mill over the past year with the board approving the investment earlier this spring. Construction will
begin this fall as planned, with the mill being fully operational to serve customers in less than a year. Synergy Feeds is a partnership operation between two strong local cooperatives;
Ceres Solutions and Ag Plus. The new mill will operate from the existing site of Synergy

partner (Ag Plus), and will feature improved quality control, enhanced biosecurity and access to an existing grain facility.
“As we continue to grow our business at Synergy Feeds, and see the increased livestock production coming into our area, we have reached a level where increasing capacities is well timed to keep pace with growing demands,” said Synergy Feeds General Manager Brent Tracey. “This facility increases capacity over our successful South Whitley operation, and at
the same time, creates operational efficiencies that we can bring to the customers we already serve, and will serve in the future.” The location was selected due to customer proximity,
utilization of an existing grain facility, and existing utility advantages.

With significant expertise in the local marketplace and the backing of both Ag Plus and Ceres Solutions Cooperative (formerly NCC) behind it, the team at Synergy Feeds is confident the project will be good for the company and the community. Synergy Feeds delivers solutions for livestock producers manufacturing high quality feed with a focus on dairy, swine, and
poultry feeds.

Synergy Feeds is a full service feed facility, customer-owned cooperative headquartered in
South Whitley, Ind., and serving north central Indiana and regions of Michigan. Synergy is a joint venture of two member-owned cooperatives in Indiana serving Ceres Solutions and Ag
Plus members. Both cooperatives are full service suppliers of energy, agronomic and feed products and services and are focused on providing the best value through service,
stewardship and innovation.